Athletes in Motion

Dustin Ortiz - Athletes in Motion Podcast Ep 036

February 28, 2023 Tom Regal and Kenny Bailey Season 3 Episode 36
Dustin Ortiz - Athletes in Motion Podcast Ep 036
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Athletes in Motion
Dustin Ortiz - Athletes in Motion Podcast Ep 036
Feb 28, 2023 Season 3 Episode 36
Tom Regal and Kenny Bailey

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Not Messing Around.......

There is no denying that Dustin Ortiz is a force.  

Growing up in rural Tennessee where he turned wrestling into fighting in the UFC then recorded the fastest knockout in history in his weight class. It only took 15 seconds.  

What do you do as an encore? Count your whole life in 8 seconds on top of a bull by joining The Nashville Stampede PBR Series.  Dustin is not settling down anytime soon.  We talk to Dustin about the early days of MMA fighting and how a chance meeting got him on top of one of the meanest animals around.    

On the Web:
www.athletesinmotionpodcast.com

On YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/@AthletesinMotionPodcast

Episodes Sponsored by:
TriTomR Endurance LLC
www.tritomrendurance.com

Show Notes Transcript

Send us a Text Message.

Not Messing Around.......

There is no denying that Dustin Ortiz is a force.  

Growing up in rural Tennessee where he turned wrestling into fighting in the UFC then recorded the fastest knockout in history in his weight class. It only took 15 seconds.  

What do you do as an encore? Count your whole life in 8 seconds on top of a bull by joining The Nashville Stampede PBR Series.  Dustin is not settling down anytime soon.  We talk to Dustin about the early days of MMA fighting and how a chance meeting got him on top of one of the meanest animals around.    

On the Web:
www.athletesinmotionpodcast.com

On YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/@AthletesinMotionPodcast

Episodes Sponsored by:
TriTomR Endurance LLC
www.tritomrendurance.com

Narrator:

Welcome to the athletes in motion podcast from race to recovery. With your hosts Tom regal and Kenny Bailey

Kenny Bailey<br>:

Hey, Tom, how are you?

Tom Regal:

I'm fantastic. Kenny, how are you?

Kenny Bailey<br>:

I am fantastic. I am also very excited to welcome Dustin Ortiz, thank you for coming to our program.

Dustin Ortiz:

We appreciate you having me. Yeah,

Kenny Bailey<br>:

I have been wanting to talk to you for a while on on on a podcast because we just every time we have a conversation has been fantastic. So to get people spun up, your background you it's fun, I don't even know where to go. Okay, so you start as a wrestler, went to MMA UFC, decided that was boring and decided to become a professional bull rider.

Dustin Ortiz:

That's kind of long story. Short there you guys.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

So is that kind of where you're at now? Right. So

Dustin Ortiz:

yeah, when it was literally that easy. Okay.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

So let's get let's start kind of back at the beginning, you were kind of a superstar stud, like, high school wrestler, right?

Dustin Ortiz:

Um, superstar, maybe not so much stud? Absolutely. I was I was pinning people left and right, good.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

So at what point did MMA start entering the picture?

Dustin Ortiz:

So, okay, so a little background I wrestled in, in middle school, and then transit or, you know, obviously going in high school. And after high school, my two older brothers, I come from a big family. So I was getting beat up, beat up. You know, three older brothers, one younger brother, which, you know, I'd get beat up and then I had to go show my moves. Right. So yeah, just naturally tough. And what my brothers did, I did so right after high school was like that, like, Okay, I know, I'm not going to college because I strongly dislike school. Right? So that's, that's my two older brothers, they ended up going to the military. So I'm like, okay, that's, that's the route I'm going you know. So let's take a year off, kind of think about it. I was working construction making what I thought was good money. So I'm pretty happy, you know, making money drinking on the weekends. I'm like, living good life. So I get it. My buddy, my buddy and I were both like, okay, like, when should we really kind of think about? Yeah, so another friend of mine is like, Hey, man, you should join this gym. Nashville, MMA. It's in Nashville, you're really good wrestler. You transition really well into jujitsu. And I was like, perfect. I'll do that to get in shape to lead me into the military. So I ended up doing that. And I kind of just walked in, like, hey, I want to fight with anatomy. Like, yeah, we hear that every single day. So six months of this two years of that I'm like, Yeah, right. I'm not doing any of that. But I will, I will do jujitsu. And I will sign up to just get back into wrestling, right? So I ended up taking the GI or jujitsu and the GI and no Gi. And they put me in the gate. And they're like, you have to be a purple belt in order to fight for us to represent us. And I was like, Alright, cool. So I get in and take my classes, and I'm just taking everybody down pin. And I think I can just do this. Learn submissions here and there. And now I'm beating like, as a white belt. I'm beating blue belts. I'm beating purple belts. And, you know, we didn't there wasn't a lot of brown and black back then. Like they were still like, I mean, this is. Yeah, exactly where black belts are like, well, we got one coming to our gym. We don't have one here. They're coming. Right? So it's kind of a big deal. But uh, my coach was like, Hey, go against you know, btw, and I was like, this guy. Yeah, like, just real skinny, kind of scraggly looking dude. And I'm like, it's gonna be easy to tap me like 10 times and five. Just happened? Yeah, I gotta learn this whole like gi thing, right? Because he's grabbing my collars, not what I'm doing. I'm getting myself into submission. And I don't even know, you know, so

Kenny Bailey<br>:

we're looking up like, what the hell happened? This

Dustin Ortiz:

guy's like, Hey, can we just take this off? Let's let's get back to wrestling and whatnot. So this gym actually fought for MMA to get legalized in the state of Tennessee. And so that's how you know how old it was. Those days of it getting legalized in new states. And so they fought for it. And they got legalized in the state of Tennessee. So they decided to put on their own first sanction show and the state and they're like, Hey, didn't you say you wanted to fight? Yeah, they're like, Well, we're putting one on of our own at the National State Fairgrounds. We'd love to have you fight for us, you know, and I was like, Oh, cool. Yeah, you know, do this. It's like it's in two weeks, and I was like, wow. I'm not taking any type of stand up at this point just gi jujitsu, um, and I'm kind of beating guys. So I feel like oh, yeah, good. So I work with a code for like two weeks, and then I end up fighting. I've never been more scared and like scared nervous, just like, What did i What did I talk myself into? In my life and coach said, Hey, you, like, Nobody's expecting you to win? Like, you're not fighting for a belt. This is just another you know, you do this every single day when you come into the gym. Yeah. And I was like, okay, that did like, make me feel better for like three seconds. Yes, I'm getting my hands wrapped up. And so long story short, I go in there, and I win. And like, half of my high school is there, you know, there's all Dawson's fighting. So I'll go so sold the place out all my all my friends family was there it was, it was amazing. And I beat the guy I think in like the second round first or second round, because we go out there. And I'm pretty nervous. So I'm like, little hesitant. And then just without even taking a second guess I just shoot on the guy, take him down, and I got him on his back like painting in my coach, like you got to punch the strike. Right, so I move into Mount and I just, you know, base up and I'm just like pounding this guy in the face until the referee stops it. And so I ended up winning and you know, the crowds going crazy. And I'm just like, Yeah, I'm so cool. Right. And then, on Monday, I was on the front page of the newspaper that's like Tennessee, you know, got MMA legalized, we put on our first you know, sanction show so we're not in the back doing it illegally, anymore. Hometown guy, Dustin Ortiz, you know, used to wrestle for Franklin High School, where he graduated, fought and won. And so there I am on the front page. So the military is out. So that's when I decided like, this is what I'm gonna do, you know, and

Kenny Bailey<br>:

you look back on that, like, how, you know, like, Oh, my God, how like, like, you were a toddler at that point. Right. Right. And the skill set you have,

Dustin Ortiz:

right, yeah, I'll drive by high school now and be like, these kids think they're all that big bookbags. And they don't even know, you know, and that was just like, a year out of high school. Yeah. So it's crazy to wow, to think that I was getting a cage fighting and, you know, like, putting it all out there.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

So that happened, at what point then you'd be like, Okay, now I gotta figure out stand up. You probably I mean, the good news is you won, right? The bad guys, you won. Because then you're thinking like, oh, yeah, well, this isn't tough. But yeah, I mean, at that point, you start saying okay, now I've really got to take this stuff seriously. Like I can't just wing it or

Dustin Ortiz:

Yeah, so looking back on it when I first signed up, I went back and told my dad because I was living with him at the time. I was like, Hey, I'm gonna I need like two years and I'm gonna make it you know, but really looking back that was just an excuse not to have to go Yeah, you know or not have to do the military like that was just kind of my out I'm pretty sure Yeah, but at the time like I think I really did think like man I could do this you know, because of my wrestling background and and the coaches were given me this sense of like, hey, like we're gonna put a little time into you know, so after that fight I was like, Oh, I can't do this and it was they were filling my head with that right and so what really kind of set it off was that because I was still working like I was still working so I'd go to work construction all day and then I'm in traffic like falling asleep or to practice right so after that, they then I think I took a couple more fights I lost my my second fight at a higher weight class. And I was like, I gotta take this serious you know if I'm going to do this and then they offered to pay for me to train full time yeah, whatever you're making work and construction will pay you that wow, to just train and then that's when I was like, okay, okay, I'm For Real doing that you're in Yeah, I'm in

Kenny Bailey<br>:

so what was the hardest so because you had a wrestling background was at the striking of all first off was what disciplines do you need to know in order to be credible and getting to a cage it's it's striking, it's it's grappling it's like what are those kinds of areas that

Dustin Ortiz:

well to build credibility? I mean, I think it's you really have to have you know, toughness and heart you can be a super skilled guy and then as soon as somebody kind of turns you know the tide on you and you start to you know, progress in the within each round and they're starting to bully you or whatever, and you kind of give up and it's you're not gonna really gain too much respect. Yeah.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

For example, if you're just a grappler do stop because you're not you don't have a stand up game is there always an excuse on that or

Dustin Ortiz:

or no so so you you you just have to be really good at one thing at least okay to get in there. Or you have to be really are a pretty basic concept have a concept of all of them. Right, because you'll have a champion who's like Demetrius Johnson, he was in my weight class 125. Just not too long ago, he posted a picture, or maybe this was a couple years now for a little bit, but he posted a picture that he was just a white belt in the ghee. But he's, you know, flying armbar and guys in the cage, it's like, Whoa, you're you're not a white belt. But like, in the in the martial arts of jujitsu. Yeah, he's a white though, right? So you don't really have to be super credential in anything, you just have to be like he was super knowledgeable across and how to blend them all together. So he'd be wrestling and grappling. And as soon as it went to the fee, he didn't even hesitate to transition into Muay Thai or kickboxing or boxing. And that's what made him so good, good. Whereas other guys, they'll be really good at jujitsu. And so they're the whole time with no stand up. And they're trying to figure out how to take this to the ground can be he was a great wrestler. Yeah, his I think that that's what got him to the level that he was at. And on his way up, he was learning the striking deal, right? So they just matched at the perfect time to make him.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

So as an opponent that you're looking at his weakness and going, Okay, if I know that, then I want to keep that person standing up. Right. Or as soon as he goes into that,

Dustin Ortiz:

right. Yeah. So. So that's a great question. So because when some people will look at it from that, like, what is he good at? What am I good at? And then I will try to maybe beat him at his weakness? Or do I try to bring him into my strength? Yeah, right. So am I going to take this fight? Because I'm a stand up guy. Yeah. And then he's the ground guy, am I going to work? My stand up to strengthen my skill? Or am I going to work my ground game to strengthen that in case he gets me to his good point? So that's, like, which? Which coach do you have? What is your what is your coach thinking? And then what are you thinking? And then what do you guys come up with together? Because I've seen it both ways. I've seen guys, let's just kind of use that as a basic example. They spent the whole camp working on their stand up, and then they do get taken down and they get submitted, right? Or vice versa. They work on their stand up the whole time, then they get to the ground, and then they get right back up. And then they're able to win. Yeah. Because they you know, they're back to their strengths, right? Or not even go to the ground. They weren't there stand up so much in defense that they kept standing the whole time. Yeah. Because that's what makes sense. Yeah, that's yeah, one

Kenny Bailey<br>:

could think also, like, you know, since the opponent, you know, you're playing chess, right? Because what's weird about about this sport, right? It's a one on one sport. But you're constantly evolving your game, you're constantly evolve your talent, they're constantly moments, are you trying to assume that you're playing chess? Right? Well, if they're thinking that, then I'm going to do this. And if they're thinking that I'm going to do this, and I'm going to do is, for example, you could work on your ground game, if you're a stand up guy, they take in the ground, say, No, I got this. And all of a sudden, you're like, surprising the hell out of them. Right? I mean, right. That could be a tactic or

Dustin Ortiz:

Absolutely, yeah. And then you think like, because all you have to feed off of is their prior fights, right? Exactly. And some guys will keep it the same, their whole careers. And then some guys, you look at one fight, and you're like, do this completely different fighter from the parent for that fight, prepare for that fight, right? So you can I mean, you can base your fights out, right? They'll offer you a fight. And if you're ready, then you take it, obviously, because your career is so small. Yeah. But the smart guys and girls work on what they are least good at in between those fights. Right? Because everybody likes to look good on the good on Instagram. Yeah, they're saying, right, who doesn't? So yeah, but the guys who are in girls who are really serious about it, I see them working more on what they're, you know, least good at? Yeah, I'll have those. And

Kenny Bailey<br>:

the other strategy is weight class. Right. So when, what was your determination on which weight? I mean, obviously, there's, there's physics involved. There's, you know, biology involved, but I mean, we're gonna be probably at a 200 pound class, we get that but what?

Dustin Ortiz:

2000 pound class? Yeah,

Kenny Bailey<br>:

like so what? When you when you decide which weight class you want to be in? Is it based off of what your capability what your, what you're feeling the best as or what the competition looks like? How do you determine what weight class do you want to be in?

Dustin Ortiz:

So yeah, that for me, it was like, where I cut my cut weight my whole life since like, sixth grade, you know? You're used to that. Yeah. And I know my body and like, where I feel best at so 125 They didn't when I first started, they didn't even have 125 It was 35 and 45 in the WEC, and so I was kind of like bulking up trying to be like, Hey, I'm gonna be a 35 or 40. FiVER, right? And then the UFC bought them out, and then they, you know, collided and now they and then they introduced the 25 because there were so many guys that were small 30 fibers, they could go down. So it's like, hey, let's make this exciting fast paced by our weight class for these guys. And then for my style, yeah, because I wrestled 130 in high school and college, my senior year. I would Yeah, I would feel best

Kenny Bailey<br>:

there. Okay, so to do 135, you would feel?

Dustin Ortiz:

I don't know, I haven't done that yet. Okay. But yeah, because I cut from so I walk around between like 50 and 55. If I'm not now I'm 55. You know, I'm in a different activity that requires, you know, just strength and just overall, like, I feel better, a little bit heavier, right, stronger. Um, whereas, like, in fighting, the lower I would go, now I'm the same height, I got the same reach, or, you know, yeah, same reaches these guys. And it kind of leveled the playing field and or made me a little bit higher, because I felt good going down there. And then bouncing back because we weigh in on Friday. Yeah, 125 on the.or 126 If you're not fighting for title, and I would see these guys like just dying, terribly trying to get down, going to weigh ins, and I'm just like, I'll fight you right now.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

Which is rare. Yeah.

Dustin Ortiz:

So So I always just felt like I would have mentally a little bit of advantage. But then there's some guys like Frankie Edgar, he's like 5657, maybe fighting at 155 walking around at 155. And he was the champion for years, you know? And it's like, so some guys were like, Hey, you don't have to cut all this way. Because you're not depleting yourself. You have all that fluid around your brain. So you can take a punch. When you deplete yourself, you know, the more you get punched? Because that is part of it. Yes, he's gonna happen. Yeah, you get dropped. We had an easier so yeah, we

Kenny Bailey<br>:

had a you know, Ian Larios.

Tom Regal:

Yeah. A lot about that.

Dustin Ortiz:

Absolutely. Best guy you can have on to talk about that kind of stuff. Yeah, he's he's worked with so many guys. It's like, and he'll, he'll be able to tell you, nutrient, nutritious, nutritious wise. Like when you deplete yourself that much, how much easier it is to get knocked out, you know, and so I would, I would deplete myself from, you know, 46 at the beginning of camp to 26, or just 20 pounds, and then be able to go in there. And I mean, I've taken my, my hits to the head, you know, but I never, I've never been knocked out, you know, and so I felt like I could take this and keep going and keep handing them out just as equally good. So that's how I kind of settled that. 35. But I mean, 2520 So now if I were to go back, everybody's like 35 years. Like, you're so much bigger now and like you're older, so it might be harder to cut that way. So my next one if I ever were to think about this, you know, like really seriously, because it's always like, yeah, you know, I know any room I walk into, like, I got that guy. But that's different from like a real training camp and fighting, right. So if I were to put myself through that and want to do it right, it would probably be 35. Just see how that feels. How much money and off I had. Yeah, yeah, exactly. Yeah. Well,

Kenny Bailey<br>:

we talked earlier, right? Most people talk themselves out of something. Yeah, I'm not ready. I'm not gonna do you spin. I think you're more dangerous as you talk yourself into stuff. Because you walk in. Yeah, I could do that. Absolutely. Yeah. No. Yeah. It's like, yeah, I can talk myself into doing something crazy. Yeah.

Dustin Ortiz:

So in the older I get, and the more like, there's, I think it's more of a culture thing, where people are talking people out of doing things, because maybe their experience or whatever, it wasn't worth it for them. Yeah. And and so when I tell people what I do, and what I've done, and records that I hold and stuff like that, they're they're just like, Wow, you did all that. And I'm like, yeah, like, you're still doing that. And like, yeah, keeps me alive. It's like, Yeah, I kind of feel like I'm breaking that mold of like, No, you need to, you know, get a job and play it safe. It's like, that's not life to

Tom Regal:

people, the people that we've talked to and had on the podcast, that have been successful, like you walked in with, like, just not knowing, you know, not knowing enough to talk themselves out of it. So they kind of get in there. And it just kind of like, I don't know, I don't know what's gonna happen, but I'm gonna go and try it, and they do it. And then they're successful. It's not they can't talk themselves out of it, because they don't feel bad side of it. Right. You probably get

Kenny Bailey<br>:

older brothers like, well, you know, my older brother hit me harder than that. So, yeah. So when when you're in MMA, so the I'm assuming the pinnacle is UFC, right, is that that's everybody's trying to get to. And then you mentioned the UFC. 125 125. Yep. And so Mexico City, you're getting prepared. This is awesome. I love this. So you recorded the fastest knockout in your weight class in UFC history. How many seconds?

Dustin Ortiz:

15 seconds. 15? I think it was 14 but it's recorded as 15

Kenny Bailey<br>:

minutes. 14 seconds. Tell us how so tell us the situation that you were preparing for this? Yeah, I mean, how does one How does one get to a 14 second knockout?

Dustin Ortiz:

Yeah, so that was that was a man that was a great camp because there's a little smack talk smack and smack talk going on, you know, now but not from me. But from this guy because he had trained at Team Alpha Male, which was a camp, an hour and a half, I believe from where I was at. And I had gone up there previous, you know, I think probably two years prior to that, and did a little training up there and I had sparred with this guy. Well, I was fighting a week later, I think it was actually here in Nashville. And so I was getting ready for a fight within that week. You know, if you're sparring on Saturday, you're just going through the motions, your game planning and getting ready to taper and yeah, and this guy is trying to take me out. I was like, looking at his coach, I'm looking around like, I don't, I'm not gonna, I don't want to cuss on your podcast, but you're not gonna, you know, be a pussy. It'd be like, No, you're going too hard. Right? So I'm looking around, like, hoping that somebody's gonna stop this. And sure enough, you know, your favorite comes over. He's like, Hey, bro, he's, he's Friday, next week, like you guys are just moving, you know? And so he just kind of kept at it. And I was like, Alright, whatever, like, ego does, I'm just gonna let this guy be who he is, like, that's cool. Not gonna go with you again. Right? So, so once we, you know, accept this fight, because I was like, oh, yeah, I can beat this guy. Easy, right? Yeah. And he starts chirping, that he knocked me out in practice. I'm like, why? Like, okay, I'm like real deals. Like, once I hear that, I'm like, Okay, I'm not going to look up what he's doing. I don't want to hear any interviews that he's done. Trying to do me and I'm gonna stay focused. So it's in Mexico City. So I go, and I'm all I'm like, when I train. I'm like, I'm gonna there's no cheating. I'm strict on my diet. I'm all in a I've lived in Tennessee, through most of my UFC career. And then I would fly out to California. As soon as I got the call. Now, it's been a month or two or three, depending on as soon as I got the call, I've booked my flight. And I was out there, right? So

Kenny Bailey<br>:

how, what is the ideal amount of time you need between like when you get that call?

Dustin Ortiz:

So it kind of varies. If for guys who train consistently like six weeks is ideal, right? But if you're kind of just training once a day, or you got a part time job that you're working, because it's not going to pay all the bills when I first start right. For me, I was back home in Tennessee, and I was just kind of working on the farm doing whatever training once or twice a day. So for me, it'd be like, yeah, good eight times. That would be nice. Yeah. So I would go out there and Mexico City, high elevation, I bought the altitude tent. I was sleeping in that every single night and I read this book called The oxygen advantage. So I started taping my mouth shut. Sorry. Just breathe, you know, nasal breathing. Okay, so I was going to all your positions, you're all in? Yeah, I'm gonna outpace this guy. Yeah. And beat the crap out. Yeah, I know, that he's had he knocked me out. Yeah. And so yeah, just going into the fight. I was just all all in just 100% dedicated switching stances. You know, you see it right in the, in the beginning of that, in that fight, I'm switching stances and my coach is like, okay, you know, he's gonna, he's gonna come in, he's gonna come in high, he's gonna come in heavy because he said, he knocked you out. So he's gonna try to prove it, you know? He's like, sometimes we have to bite down on our mouth guard. And, you know, let lay art out our combinations that we've been drilling, which was uppercut, hook, cross, right. I don't think I was that exact one. Yeah, but I threw a an overhand uppercut and then overhand. And it's just all stuff that you you drill. Yeah. So yeah, he comes out. I'm kind of like trying to do him a little bit. And he comes in, I'm like, Oh, I turn away. So I'm like, Oh, he's like, he's real. Right? He's coming at me. That's just what we talked about. So then the second time, I knew it was coming again. And it says, Put your head down and throw that overhand. So I did I put my head down, you know, kind of looking out of my peripheral. Yeah, through that overhand. And then when I looked up, he looked like a mind. Glass, right. And I was like, she'd gone punching him as fast as I could. And he went down and just hammer fist and the ref pulled me off. And I looked back like, like, Was there more overlap? Yeah, you just never know. And it's so what's funny, what's funny about it is after like when you're in the back, because everybody goes to the green room, right? UFC has green room, you go back there, you get to watch the other fights on the TV and there's food and all this good stuff and a little weird when you lose because now you're so but it's cool. So you go back there. And when somebody comes in and you're maybe beat up you fought 15 minutes your your whatever, and this dude just had a you know, first round knockout. You kind of look at him like, that was cool, but me, right? Yeah. And I always kind of because I had tough fights. And for the first time yeah. 18 seconds walk back, unscathed. Yeah, who's worked harder? Yeah, it's

Tom Regal:

warm. And I could take another one if you got So let's go just by

Kenny Bailey<br>:

the crowd must have just like on apeshit Crazy, right? Yeah. I mean, that's gotta be an intoxicating feeling right? Yeah, everyone's going crazy. You hit that. Right, right. And I think we talked about this before, but it must feel like on one hand, it's great that you got that. On the other hand, though, but you were training for eight weeks like you were dialed in. And yeah, before you know it, you're looking around like, yes, we go get tacos. Like, what do I do now? Feel pretty good. Yeah. So tell folks how, how tough is it to stay at that UFC level? Because, you know, I think there's this

Tom Regal:

because you don't have a season right? We have a season, right? We have we have an off three or four months or more lag in between that we can actually let ourselves relax a little bit bring our bodies back in. But you guys need to stay on until the phone rings. Right? At least some level?

Kenny Bailey<br>:

Yeah, it's not just that right. Your season. It's a business at the end of the day, right. I'm sure that they have the right they want the right fighters, not only in the right. But I mean, they're they're trying to make a spectacle. I don't say spec mean, like web by any means. But I mean, they still got to

Dustin Ortiz:

come out. It's entertainment. 100%. Remember that? Well, I want to come back to that. I

Kenny Bailey<br>:

guess that's my point. So when you when you it's not just you can't just be a good fighter, you you have to be a good character. Is that a? Is that a off base thing to say? Or is that?

Dustin Ortiz:

No. So that's so let's, if I leave if I don't lead into that, yeah, bring me back to that. So because I want to answer the question of how hard is it? Yeah, to stay there. Right. And a great man, Bert Watson, he used to work for the UFC, kind of the height man, right? He would hype everybody up in the back. And I don't even know if that was on purpose. I was just who he was, right? Yeah, you love to see. And he would lead fighters out, he would come back in five minutes, five minutes, and we walk, you know, and you're like, oh, yeah, do minutes. And he was just on top of it. Right. And so he would lead you out to the cage and position you and all that good stuff. And one thing that he would say every single show was it's hard to get here. It's even harder to stay. Yeah. And I just like if I could tell all fighters that yeah, it not just in the UFC, but as a career. It's hard to be a fighter. It's hard to do it for a long time. So get in, make your money take your hits as least as mount as possible. Yeah, right. fulfill whatever you're trying to, because at the end of the day fighting is is you will grow out of it. You don't

Kenny Bailey<br>:

there's no Tom Brady.

Tom Regal:

Some of that anger is gonna go away. desire to be in the battle is gonna go away.

Dustin Ortiz:

Exactly. Yeah. And. And so that was something that he said. And it was it's never been more true. So once you get to that high level, you have guys who train year round, after the fights. They're the first guys in the gym, because that's kind of some coaches distill that like, Hey, look at this guy. He fought on Saturday, Monday. He's back in the gym grinding. Yeah, and for me, I don't think that's you need to take some time.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

But you're a target at that point, too. I mean, you just knock the guy out in 18 seconds. Yeah. 13 We'll debate 15 By the end of this, it's gonna be nine. 3.0 coming out. But you have a target now to Yeah, I mean, cuz it's like, wait a minute, that guy just did that. So he's my minute. There's people putting you on their wall. Right. Right. Like,

Dustin Ortiz:

right. He's the guy are on there punching but yeah, exactly. Yeah.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

I mean, they're, they're coming after you. So yeah. So tell us about that entertainment portion of it, then it's, it's

Dustin Ortiz:

right. So then leading into that, which is like now it's it's an entertainment industry, right? Like the UFC. It's a business. But it's an entertainment business. Right. So now you have guys who? Yeah, they're pretty good fighters. But you put this mic right in front of them. And they're gonna say some things that are just like, have you laughing? Or like, I can't believe you said that. And with social media, they're turning them into memes. And they're, you know, and people are taking it and running with it. And then you're popular. You go from like, 10,000 20,000 followers to a million, you know, 100,000 in overnight, right. And you're getting tweeted about and all that good stuff. So little cool. Fun fact, for me, at least, you guys might think it's cool. You know, Travis Barker. Yeah. So he tweeted at me, said that he didn't even like make it to the fridge and back. Holy crap. Yeah. Yeah. And I was just like, wow, so that's like the eyes that you have on you, you know? Yeah, eight weeks of just hard sleeping at altitude in a tent. Grind. And it's not just that eight weeks, but this is years that I've been doing this I know. So it's not the eight weeks that made that fight. It's all the years that I've been putting into makes it worth it, you know, and it's like, that's the kind of work that you have to put in for that little second of whoever's watching you.

Tom Regal:

And that clip lives on YouTube. It will be posted and it will be Yeah, we're gonna throw it in the middle here or while we're talking we're gonna drop it in the went to YouTube

Dustin Ortiz:

in flyweight history. I think the one before that was a minute something well, minute 40 Maybe.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

So does that change your so that does that start changing sort of your mind at that point? Because you're like, Oh, crap now. Now I have to perform now I have to like, do you feel like an added bit of pressure? When when you're in that you should be saying crazy stuff? You can say crazy stuff right now, if you want the nine people watching No,

Dustin Ortiz:

yeah, I've never Is this live? No, no. Okay, now we're recording this my brother in law. So I had to really forgot to ask if it was live on tape was sorry. Yes. Yeah. So no, I always put so much pressure on myself, like growing up. My two older brothers are twins. And then my little brother and my little sister are twins. And we're kind of like the five from the same parents. So we've kind of never really got separated until a little bit older. So two sets of twins. And I'm right in the middle. I always was like fighting for attention, so to speak, right. And so I always put pressure on myself, to be something to do something, whatever. And I always just kind of felt like, I would like working on the farm. I was like going and doing this construction and blah, blah, blah. But after a couple months, I'm like, This is not for me. Yeah, God bless whoever this is for them. But like, this is not me. So I always put that so much pressure on myself. And after a knockout. Yeah, people expect it. But for me, it was just like, that's kind of unrealistic, because I didn't even expect to get that. Right. So like, am I gonna go bum rush somebody within 15 seconds just to beat it? Yeah, it's not the smartest thing. Right? So he kind of was not unless

Tom Regal:

you want them to have the record.

Dustin Ortiz:

Wait, 15 Get on the other end of that. Yeah. But no, I've never felt really any added pressure of like, people recognizing me and saying, Oh, this and that. And I'm just kind of like, dude, I'm just a regular dude. Like, it's cool that I've accomplished that. But I put so much pressure on myself. I'm not gonna let somebody else's. You know, thoughts and whatever. Do you

Kenny Bailey<br>:

do you feel a sense of pressure, though, to become a character? Because you see that that's working for other people, right? Absolutely.

Dustin Ortiz:

Yeah. Yeah, I do. I did.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

Did you develop the character? Or? No, I

Dustin Ortiz:

never had a nickname. I never, you know, my whole life. I never had a nickname. Yeah, my brother will call me like Jr. Now I'm Uncle does. Buddy calls me or his aunt? cute as can be. She'll, she'll say, oh, dusty. So I'll get that from time to time. But no, I never ever had a nickname or any, you'd have to feel like you needed that. But I felt pressure just on the sense of you know, all the champions we're known for, you know, kind of a character. Exactly. You know, you almost form that on your way up. Yeah. And getting into the business aspect of it, especially like we're talking about, it's now entertainment industry. So with that being, you know, said it's like you do have to form a character to be something right to sell, yeah, to sell. And so people can just sell themselves, but the people who create a character that people love is or hate, which right works just

Tom Regal:

as well, proving that. All right, they seem

Dustin Ortiz:

to excel a little bit more. Right. So an AR champion was Demetrius Johnson, in my opinion, the greatest MMA fighter of our time, right, right there with John Jones. The guys are just unbelievable. But he didn't sell right because he wasn't known for really anything. He was just winning. He was quiet. He played his video games and it's just kind of like there's no really he's not gonna go because he wasn't getting paid what he thought he was there is no above and beyond whereas like John Jones, like he's out party in itself in trouble and people know him as that we're trying to be a good guy, which is like well, just so you kind of and then with with Conor McGregor coming in, he really took it to a whole new level of this is a character that I've formed and I'm gonna uphold with this the whole time and he did and he just went through the roof and now you have younger guys with this new generation of doing that and they're exceeding the hoarder workers the the guys who you know ultimately in my opinion, would deserve a title shot but they're getting chosen over these guys because radio shows ticker. They got like three UFC fights. Yeah, they're choosing that guy over guy who has 10 to 15 burned it? Yeah, you know, but nobody really know. Like, oh, he's fighting. It's

Tom Regal:

all about views. It's all about people watching.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

You go rager like, you know, wide receivers when they get a touchdown or walking like McGregor when they're done. I mean, right, right. I mean, he's not the greatest whiskey but he's got a whiskey right? So haven't turned. I mean, so he was smart enough to turn that which is cracks me up.

Dustin Ortiz:

And I see that, like, more clearly, now that I've stepped away from it. Well, if you go back well, we'll create a character for you. So

Tom Regal:

Well the thing is, if you create this character, that's really not you, you have to hold that up. So 20 years later, when you're retired, and you're just hanging out, everyone expects that character and you're just like, well, that's not me. I don't want to do that anymore. You still have to do that. Right? You're going to have to keep that character going, which is like you want it to be more like you. Yeah. So shouldn't have to work so hard later on.

Dustin Ortiz:

Right? And so like, it's cool. It's cool for me that, like people know me know who I am know that I'm a fighter. And I kind of like, I have a resting bitchface for

Kenny Bailey<br>:

it's for me, so I mean, son of a bitch.

Tom Regal:

Smile. Yeah. So

Dustin Ortiz:

I've talked to people, it's like me, I've been wanting to say what's up, but you're just sitting here. I was a little nervous. And you're just like, the coolest dude. So it's like, that's kind of the care like, I don't I don't care to be like center of attention and all this like fighting for your like, like, No, I'm just and then once you get to know me, you're like, dude, that that's a cool dude. Like, I could hang out with him. Right. And I think I think that's, that's more of a character that I want to be then a super well known character. Well,

Kenny Bailey<br>:

and when I first met you, I thought that I thought you were going to be just like, because you, you your persona that you give off. I mean, you've got to look, you've

Dustin Ortiz:

Yeah, I think you're eyeballing me like, Hey, guy,

Kenny Bailey<br>:

right now. Right? And I'm like, Can I have that? But but you find out you're just you're fun to talk to I mean, you're you're really open. You're really you're really fun to talk to. And it's, it's like when I left, I'm like, it's just surprising to because you're when you see you on the photos, and you see you're fighting. I mean, I'm assuming your mindset. I'm always curious about this two things I'm curious about on the way in and then the walk in, right. So on the way in, it's always fun. What are your thought process when you're like standing across? Like, are you? Is it truly like I'm gonna rip your frickin head off? Or is it more of a quiet confidence? I mean, what do you what do you try to portray when you're staring down? Like somebody at the weigh in?

Dustin Ortiz:

Yeah. Oh, at the weigh in or in the cage at the weigh in both at the weigh in? Okay. So

Kenny Bailey<br>:

then at the cage, I mean, when you're walking in

Dustin Ortiz:

your Yeah, so So my way in approach is my very first UFC fight. It was in Brazil against the Brazilian guy, first fight of the night. Okay. And so I didn't want to be there. I didn't want to be there. Like who signed me up. So actually funny story when when, when the UFC called. I was in a push up contest with my buddy, right? And coach calls me over. He's like, do you want to fight in the UFC next week? And I was like, are in two weeks? I think it was. And I was like, in my buddy, who I'm doing a push up contest with he's like, yes. Oh, yeah. I was just like, so taken aback, right. And so some things happened. And then I finally got to make my debut. Right. And so it was against Brazilian guy in Brazil. And I'm like, No, I want to fight here. Yeah, clear over there. And so first time in Brazil, find a guy and we pull up to this, I'm guessing an old soccer stadium. So the seats are like all concrete. It's hot. And I'm like, This is my experience with this is the UFC. Right? And I'm warming up in the back, and I can hear them out there. I mean, this is this is loud. Yeah. So just kind of fast forward a little bit. When you go to Vegas. Nobody really shows up until like the last three fights, right? It's like your real fans or somebody who flew in for UFC or there, but the last three fights. It's it's right. So I didn't know that. I thought that this is what I'm getting myself into. And the whole place I feel like it's just rocking. I'm trying to warm up. Yeah. And I had this other guy's like, oh, you know, it's your first fight. And I was like, Yeah, first fight in the UFC. He's like, what fight Are you like on the card? I'm like, I'm first fight. He's like, Oh, I'm glad that's not me. I'm like, dude. I hear that. So we walk up, they position us, you know Burt's, like hey show. hyping me up. I'm like, Hi. Yeah. And we we walk in, they put the camera in your face. And I'm like, I got this. I got this. So I'm paying. I don't like to just stand. I'm pacing back and forth. Yeah, like I've trained with the best. You know, I'm, I'm here. I'm ready. Let's go. Let's go you got this. This is all I'm saying to myself, like I can when I fucking badass. Yeah, I'm pacing back and forth and lays like cameras on and five and you got to be right there. And she's like, come back to the center. And I'm like three, and then the camera comes on you and like I'm pretty sure it's either right before then. Or in that moment. I look back to my coach because the place is just loud. Yeah. And I looked back at him and I just start busting up laughing like we both start busting up. Yeah, what ready nervous and we just I just like, laughing like, Oh, God, this is crazy. And these guys are like they're like flicking me off giving me the bird you know? Yeah, there's they're saying like who I'm away, which means you're gonna die.

Tom Regal:

No

Dustin Ortiz:

and why? knew it was good. So I'm just like, like, how do I be? Right? And so I don't even know, I would have to go back and watch. Because I think I'm just like a stiff as a board, like, walk in. And it was just hot. And, you know, I know like, alright, we get out, take your clothes, you know, take your clothes off doesn't sound good. Yeah, get into your fight shorts, and you know, hug your coach if you want to. And so we do that. And then I walked into the cage and a bulk flew on me. And I was like, Well, what do you know? Yeah. And it's like, overwhelming, just like, yeah, yeah. Feeling. And it's hot. And like, the mat is like, almost Sandy. And I'm kind of like rubbing my feet, like, how old is this? Then I just go to my corner. And at that moment, you're just kind of looking at each other. Right? And then every, every, every fight is different. So that one, I was just kind of looking at him like, oh, no, you know, this is this is a dogfight because that's really all I'm not super skilled. Right. And so that fight was so special, because it was like an out of body experience. So I literally felt like I was sitting on the cage with my feet crossed watching me fight watching. Like, bro, you should listen to your code. He was saying so much, but I just couldn't let go. And it was just like, like, literally, I was just watching myself. We go into the third period, and he's like, hey, you need to learn this combo. You need to learn this combo. It's there. You got it. Just let your hands go. Not just like, Nah, I need to take him down and finish him. He's like, okay, that's what you do it? Yeah. Because that's just all it was a super close fight. But he's a Brazilian in Brazil. And I it's happening so fast. I don't know what's going on. I'm just watching myself. Yeah. Sounds like if I'm gonna, you know, sit, if I'm gonna win this fight for sure. And secure it. This is what I have to do. And he's like, Yeah, to do it. And so that's what happened. I ended up going out there taking him down ground and pound knocked him out, TKO and the third nice, um, but so from fight to fight. Well, let's reverse so that that guy in that first fight, when he walked I weighed in, because I was the underdog. Yeah. So I weighed in first, and I go and stand in my position. And then I see him come out, get onto the scale weigh in. And then he approaches me right and we face off. Yeah. And he came in just so fast. And so like aggressively Yeah, just looked into my soul. Like this overwhelming like, bro, I'm about a cold cocky, right. Like, yeah, back up a little bit. And he just held in, I just looked into his eyes, like, I'm not gonna back down at all. Yeah. And I like that was so ingrained in me that I knew that that's what I wanted to do to every guy that I that I came across that I was going to face off against. And old statues, if you look at like, some of the, like Greek gods and stuff like that their back foot is always up. So they're in like a, like a motion of ready to like, forward and forward. Yeah. And I was like, that's kind of what I want. So I was always like, leaning forward, like, I'm gonna bring the fight. There's no back down in me. My foots ready, I'm going yeah. So whether I was the one, you know, the underdog, which I was most my career, I was, like, come at me. And here we go every or I'm coming off the scale, shake Dana's hand and then I'm like, like, in your face, I can go. So that's kind of my that was my mentality of the face off right after way.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

I kind of feel like it's sort of like, you know, wide receivers that have to have a Super Bowl dance. It's sort of like you got to develop, you're like, What is that thing that's going on? And it must be I mean, you're getting all sorts of different sides. So you know, you're, I mean, there must be at some point, you look at this guy, like, oh, shit, or not always, because the competence of like, you have to be that right? You can be no other way. But just like, like you said, I may not have the skill, but it's gonna be a dogfight. I'm not leaving, you know, nicely. We're not we're, you know, someone's gonna get hurt before. Yeah, leaves that kind of thing.

Dustin Ortiz:

Yeah. So but you've always had that. Right. Right. And that's just kind of engraved in, in who I am. Right. And I think that that's more of like, how did you grow up? You know, how were you raised? Where your parents there? Were they not? Were you in a rough neighborhood. Were you in a nice neighborhood. And, like, some people might grow up in a nice neighborhood, but they just have that that dog in them that's like, I this was my parents, I want this for myself, or I want to prove that I'm this great quarterback, or this great football player, this great fighter for me is just like, I'm just trying to I'm just trying to fight and just prove like that I'm just something you know, not just like so we came from, you know, super poor background and growing up really relevant till we moved to Tennessee, one of the nicest country right now, you know, but it's just like always, like, I'm a smaller guy fighting no matter what, like every day you're fighting. Exactly. Yeah. So that was just always there. And now I get to express it. And most of it was just naturally until I gained the technique right. So when I was walking out in the in the beginning, it was all serious. like cameras on me, how do I act? And then it turned into like, oh, shoot, to do this, kind of like moving around showing people that it's like, yeah, this is now my comfort zone, right? And I'm like, I know the cameras on me. What are people? You know, reading when you're transitioning? What are people thinking as you're walking out? And then it's like, I don't really care. Like, I'm happy, what's up? I'm here, I'm moving, I'm loose. I just I've done everything that I can possibly do. And I'm focused, right? So that's another thing to answer your question when you're when you first get into the cage, right? So I always kind of like approach the cage, like, Okay, now it's time to work, I'm going to enter aggressively. Like, I don't want to feel the cage, I want to kind of do maybe a Ford roll or a couple shots to feel where I'm at. And then I just start pacing. And in the beginning, I was like that dog ready to be let off the leash. You know, I'm just pacing until somebody says, Go, are like horses, when they're about to race. They're like, Yeah, you got to hold them back. And then you let they let them go. So that was kind of my, my approach in the beginning. But as my career went on, I'm like, No, I know, I have that dog. Right. So I want to stay calm, because he's ready to go. And so I started, when I was sparring and training and a comfortable gym, I go to every single day, I would picture that I was in the cage. And then when I got into the cage, I would picture that I was in the vise. Yeah. And it was like, it just made me more comfortable. And I think that really worked for me, because I didn't really want to look at the other guy. Because then you know, Mike Tyson said that he would get in and he would lock eyes. And I felt like if I locked eyes, I would have to keep that. So I was like, I'm not gonna give him that. So as soon as, because when you get when you see you do pace, and you're like, oh, dudes chill. Yeah, so just always wanted that. That's fine. And then once we're ready, we're ready to go. Same thing. I never wanted to sit down in between rounds. Because I never did that in training. Yeah, nobody comes in and brings a chair

Tom Regal:

turning of all the places.

Dustin Ortiz:

But that's not how it was. So I would always like face away from the guy. Because there's two coaches in and then one coach on the outside most of the time. So I listen, he would, he would talk he would talk and then he would talk and advise everybody seen different things. You got to stand up ground. And so yeah, it was just like, I just wanted to stay and be with my team and let the blood flow naturally. Because you sit down you're like, This feels good. A minute. All right. Yeah, your

Tom Regal:

energy.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

So it's, by the way, we can talk about this for like hours if I could. Yeah. Great. So here, you're a fighter, all of a sudden, you know, are you driving home and you see a bowl and you're thinking to yourself, well, I want to write that. Yeah. Or how did like, how does a guy that's what am I doing next?

Tom Regal:

Yeah, like, let's see.

Dustin Ortiz:

So I was driving and my old truck down just you know, go into my go into my secret spot. Had this girl with me, you know, we're going to the Shona, the place, you know, and the sons kind of say, and it's gonna it's nice summer day, windows open. And, you know, these cows are coming across the road. It's like it's natural around the country, right? And they all passes just as bowls in the middle, right middle of the road. I can't go down because both sides are like, deep dishes, or ditches, right? So I can't go around. So I kind of like pull up to him Hong Kong Kong. He's not moving. Just like whatever and his own backups. What are you gonna do on my own? Oh, like get out. So I'm still not I'm like, I'm not gonna touch this thing. Like, maybe not moving. So like, Okay, well, we're going to the spot on these backroads United feeling good, whatever. So I was like, Okay, so I'm just kind of backup to this thing. I'm gonna jump on it because it's not aggressive. I was so working on my, my storytelling. I started writing the greatest compliment ever. So. Yeah, okay, so I need to work on that story. Ya know, so. Smile is doing so good. No, so I worked with the strength and conditioning coach when I was living in Denver getting ready for a fight. And he worked with bull riders down at the Performance Center. I think he would call it the PBR Performance Center down in Pueblo, Colorado. So I went down there just met him through a friend of mine, it's like, Hey, you should go check out his name is Antoine he runs this place. He's like, he's really good. You know, just his, his strength and conditioning would translate into fighting. So I was getting ready for a fight, drove down there. And just, you know, I was like, Hey, what are the chances of me getting on? He's like, Oh, you don't want to do that, you know, especially when you're still fighting like after, you know, for sure. I'm talking to me. Yeah, exactly. But right now, no. So I taken this fight and uh, by rain, lost by decision, and I think like two weeks later, he calls me and he's like, Hey, you still want to get on a bowl and I was like more than ever. Yeah. And he's like, Okay, we're gonna put this camp on in a month. And it's going to be super professional. It's put on by a PBR put on by us, we're going to have bullfighters medics, real bull riders, we've been there done that PBR world champions. If you're gonna go do it, like this is the safest environment, you know, because you can go, you know, to his to some dudes ranch where everybody's drinking a few beers, and they're like, ellonija. Exactly. Yeah. Bushwacker you know, slinging across the fence, but so I was like, okay, yeah, absolutely. So I signed up for this camp. The three day camp, I ended up getting on six bowls in the in the two days, or three days. Yeah, I got on to the first day. Three, no, three, the first day to the second day. And then the third one was like a mini rodeo that they put on our bull riding event. Okay. And what was your question? First, how did I got into our Yeah, so that's kind of how that came to be was like, you know, had the opportunity. And I just just had lost a fight. And I was like, it's kind of it was always like, a little bucket list thing. Like we'd watch PBR growing up. Because we, you know, grew up on a farm. It's like, dude, these guys are beast, you know, they're crazy. Like, it's just like, Yes, a little attractive. Yeah. So

Kenny Bailey<br>:

on the one hand, you know, like Tom and I are doing that would be insane. But the fact that you are, you're physically in incredible shape, right? Yeah, you spend your life doing nothing but balance, right? Because you're trying to counter whatever move that they're doing. So at first, when I heard you were doing that, I'm like, That guy's nuts. Then I'm like, well, actually, that's probably the most sane thing to do. If someone's gonna go do it, because yeah, you have that experience of being able to understand that when you first got on that bowl, first off, Did you shit yourself? And secondly, it's like, Did it feel like okay, you know, does your innate nature of you, like I said, having to figure out how to balance how to kind of counter did that kind of come into play?

Dustin Ortiz:

Yeah, all of that came into play. So as soon as I got there, I was just super nervous. Right? And I have all these cowboys telling me like, Do this, do that do this? And I'm like, yeah, one year now. Yeah. Right. I'm like,

Kenny Bailey<br>:

this is like your first MMA fight. Right? You're all like, I'm doing. What the hell is one

Dustin Ortiz:

year out together? And then what comes natural? just comes natural. Yeah. You know, I get into the cage. My first fight. He's throwing punches. I'm taking you down because I know wrestling, right. Yeah. So getting on I just kind of was like, this is just like a fight. Yes, super nervous. Every I see guys warming up. So I'm gonna get loose, too. I know, that's smart. So I'm about to do something. I had no gear. So this guy's like, hey, which was super cool. And that's what I love about like the bull riding and the Western sports and rodeo in is all those guys. As crazy as they are the community. They really look out for you. That's cool. And I think that's across the board. You know, because this is very dangerous. So it's not like, you do have your Yeah, who's out there that will say, Oh, come get on, you know, and just because they're bold needs exercise. Yeah. But we're, you know, across the board, they're very, like, we're gonna take care of you, you know, so this guy, let me use his rope and a rope is, to me, it's kind of like gloves. You don't just let anybody use your rope. Like mine. I haven't had, you know, like, here's my rope. Here's my helmet. Yeah, I went bought boots. I didn't have boots. You know? Here's, you know, every every day. Yeah. So I started getting ready. Put it on, just like as if I was gloving up. So I just was like, Okay, this is it. And then they're like, that's your bowl. And so they load them in the shoe. And then you have like four other bowls that they're gonna run in there, right? Yeah. So they're like, that's your bowl. So I'm kind of eyeballing him over to him, like it's kind of hard to be a little bit of like, somebody helped me put this rope off. So they helped me do all that and I kind of count I'm like, Alright, I'm up in like this much time so I'm like, warming up drinking water and and then I just like hey, you're up next after this one, you know, we're gonna go over there and then we're gonna come back over here. So they this bowl goes and then over there and then then you're up. So it because I am who I am. And it was a camp and really, they were really focused on climate in there. Somebody's gonna go over procedure and help you and talk you through it. And I'm just like, it didn't really help make you feel better within that guy. Yeah, this is how you're gonna get on this how you approach it and see I get out there I'm ready. I got a glove. You know, they take me up and they're like, alright, jump in there just like got done showing you so I get in there and you know, you slide down on him and you just feel like the warmth of this bowl. All it is is breathing and it's just like, like it just overwhelming consuming, like, feeling you've never had before. Right and right this

Tom Regal:

like to me to do in a slightly annoyed at this point, right? Exactly, yeah.

Dustin Ortiz:

So you know, depending on the bowl, they'll try to Horn you while you're in the shoe or they'll lean on you. So this is these are still a little late. Yeah, this 1000 pound bull was leaning on, it's like, you know, and there's just so much going on. So it's like, Okay, let's try to make this fast because he's getting annoyed that he's in this and he knows what's about to happen. So they put me on they're like, Okay, just, you know, hold on, chest out, kind of lean forward, keep that hand that just stabilizing hand, try not let it come too far back. Because everything's over because they're jumping forward. Okay, so you want to match there for this, right? And I'm just thinking, like, I'm just trying to, I'm trying to match nothing. I'm just trying to hold on. Yeah. And they it was there was so much that it's just like, I realized now they're just like, get on and ride, right? So and that's what happened. They open up the chute, I nod my head, like when you're ready. You know, I nod. And we go out of there. And I felt like this was like the biggest bowl there, which was the smallest. But I got the bigger reality. He goes and he just kind of hops across the across the pin the circle pin. And he goes left and I just keep going straight. I jump onto the up onto the fence like I've seen many times before. I'm looking around like he's just standing there like, I'm done. Yeah, coming back at me. So that's my heart's racing. And this was a PBR put on. So there's cameras and because of my fighting, they're like, What do you think? And I was like, I can do better. I wasn't making sure I just Yeah, and I was like, after that that was one of those scenes where because of the situation like MMA fighter doing this is pretty big deal. I was trying to say a lot of the right things, but I was like, That was crazy. It so it was like, but I knew right there like that was, that was nothing. That was nothing like that. I can't do you know, and I knew that I could do better. So I was like, I want to do it again. They're like, yeah, yeah, you got it. So, what's funny, so after the first three, then they're like, Hey, we're gonna come back tomorrow. We're now that we've seen what you do. And you got guys saying, like, Dude, you're a troll, right? Yeah, after the weekend. Everybody's like, dude, if you wanted to do this, like, I really think you could tell everybody, right? Your fighter, your balance your balance. And so I believed him. And I was like, well, at that time, like fights were kind of fallen through. And it's just like more works. And it was fun anymore. And then for bull riding, and just doors start opening. Right. So I was like, I think I might be onto something here. Right? I just I love it. There's nothing you know, I they do train hard. Don't get me wrong, but like fighters, hand three times a day hands down the hardest working athletes that I know. Are they always smart about their their training? No. But are they the hardest workers? It is? Yeah, hands. Right. Yeah, hands down the hardest workers.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

So I think to dissuade some myths about like these bulls, right? They're specifically bred for this, right? There's people that bred breed, you know, riding bulls, right? And then they're not, you know, they're not getting gored. They're not, you know, being prodded in the nuts to try to do stuff. I mean, these guys kind of know what they're doing. Right. And they have a personality, because you mentioned before, like, yeah, some of them are just going to be like, you know, get off me. I'm done. Others are going to be like looking for you. So describe sort of, you know, those kind of

Dustin Ortiz:

this guy with a great question. Questions. Yeah, each bowl is like, kind of like a person. They all have their personalities. You know, like, when you're in the shoe, some will try to warn you, like while you're in there, and you're like, hey, like we'll sit down in the shoe. And which makes it super hard. You never want to open the gate when we launch down. Yeah.

Tom Regal:

Yeah, absolutely. Bring,

Dustin Ortiz:

right Yes. So that's happened. That's why I was sitting down and they're kind of leaned up against a shoe. And when they jumped up, my knee hit every single race.

Tom Regal:

And, you know, they know what they're doing.

Dustin Ortiz:

Yeah, yeah, exactly. That's when I would say hey, let's give this guy a shot. Yeah, but, but then you have Yeah, they then you have some they come in, they're big, bad. And they know like, I'm just gonna stand here, you get ready, and then I'm gonna give you Yeah, hell, you know, and it's like, no, that's kind of what you what you want, you know, you're pulling that rope just as tight as you can get it, you know, so you're secure in your hand down there, right? Um,

Kenny Bailey<br>:

that's a weird feeling. I mean, because I see that. I mean, you guys are like, it's needed to stay on the ball, right? Well 100% Yeah, but also like, you gotta get off that damn thing, right? So you got this, I mean, how they tend

Tom Regal:

to blow their stomachs out a little bit while you're putting that on there, and then it loosens, right? Because I know horses that would do that I worked with horses when I was a kid. And when we would try to put put all the apparatus and stuff on him, we had a couple that would actually blow their bellies out a little bit. And you would be trying to get it as tight as possible. And then they would relax and it would be loose and you feel like you would you stop it. And

Dustin Ortiz:

everybody right there just

Kenny Bailey<br>:

roll but your hand is still stuck in there. I mean, know how stuck is your hand? I

Dustin Ortiz:

guess. So there's two types of rope. There's an American rope that really ties down your hand. It'll really like it'll cut the blow off. Yes, like sucked down on your hand. And then you have a Brazilian rope that's a little bit looser. So it's like, I would have to Yeah, I would have to kind of show you show brought mine. But it's so as no matter how tight the guy is pulling it, yeah, they're still going to, if you let go, you'll be able to get your hand. Okay, so those guys, they'll use a lot of rosin, which will help it get real, real sticky. The guys who and I'm no professional by any means. So if I if I sound like I know what I'm talking about. I'm still still learning a lot. So but the American guys the way that it sucks down on your hand. Yeah, you I mean, it's as tight as you can get it. And that bowl moves an inch, your hand moves in edge it and so some guys like that. So they know.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

I'm just trying to go after the eight seconds are over, you're getting bucked off. You know, I don't want my dislocated shoulder on

Tom Regal:

Yeah, yeah, striking off the ball, you just you

Dustin Ortiz:

grab your you grab that lead rope end of it, and then you kind of pull it which one do you purchase in? Man, I think at the end of the day, within time, I think in American rope is probably better. Because like I said, it really tightens your hand down. And even if you let go, it's still pretty tight. Yeah. So so you get hung up more.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

But it feels like to me like just knowing you and talking about what you're doing you process quickly, right? I mean, you know, like, yeah, on the American one like for me, I'd be like, What shit? What am I going to do? What? Oh, yeah. Oh, yeah. It feels to me like you. You're able to adapt quickly do everything to say, yeah,

Dustin Ortiz:

yeah, I think 100% good at adapting. Yeah, but so the so the Brazilian you can like go in the bowl will kind of take you off to wherever, space. So it's like, I think the Brazilian is really good. It's just looser, you have more more room to kind of the Brazilians tend to really open themselves up and lend their hand go and get kind of crazy on the bull. Whereas American, they really push forward to the front of the door. And you can feel every inch of that bowl, right, where the other one has a little more play. So I would like I'm using a Brazilian right now, because I think it's a good beginner rope. Because if you get hung up and you get flung off, your hand comes out. Okay. And your natural instinct, you know, when you're getting slung around is to hold on. Let go for dear life. Yeah. Everybody's like, you gotta hold on, right. And so because that's happened to me before. The first time I tried to Brazilian, I wasn't used to so much rosin. So it's super sticky. And when I put my hand in there, like, you'd have to peel your fingers off to like, go hang on, hang

Tom Regal:

on, hang on. Yeah.

Dustin Ortiz:

I was locked in, I got slung off. And I was like this, you know, looking over here, outer space. And I realized after like, that I was just holding on. Yeah. And so when I let go, or Yeah, the guy, you know, the bullfighter kind of helped me. It was like, Whoa, like, that's in my hand was kind of stuff too, because

Kenny Bailey<br>:

I just kind of go back to that one where you ran up to the fence and I bet like everybody's laughing their ass off right? There. They're looking at

Tom Regal:

you like 100 yards away.

Dustin Ortiz:

client so that goes back to like character, the more than I'm around him. Yeah, there are bulls who like to take their victory lap. Right. Especially like in the PBR. You got a crowd. They kind of like to get me right. Yeah. And then you have some that as soon as you get bucked off, the rider gets bucked off. Then they go right back into the, into the shoe, you know, they go Yeah, right into the bag. And then you have some that are like, Hey, you got me I'm fixing to get you better to be on your toes. Yeah, the, you know, the bullfighters or the bull rider you know, so they'll they'll look back and they'll try to get you. Yeah, so which is which is all fun. So when you go back to, to the practice pins, and you don't get on a PBR level, high level bowl every single time. Yeah, right. So when you're practicing, it's, you don't always want to spar the best.

Tom Regal:

You want to work on technique. Exactly.

Dustin Ortiz:

Yeah, to try this new move. All right. So you get on bowls that are like as soon as they get done. They just kind of stand there. It's like, hey, get to the back, you know, or they'll they'll go back to They're, they just kind of give you a nice, they got good rhythm. So you practice rhythm or, you know, the first bowl that I got on I come to realize real fast that that's what they put all the beginners, which is you know when I started riding Yeah, I would ride around the whole pin. I'm like, I'm feeling good and you're getting it as you know when I get on bigger better bowls, I'm like so like, you would never let me if I wasn't doing that you would never let me on something like this right? So, I mean, I've been on some pretty bad, bad bulls. I like I should pretty rank. That's what they say. Like your rank bowl. You're right. Yeah, I was thinking bad, like, Bad to the Bone tight. Yeah. But uh, yeah, I've gotten on some pretty ranked bulls. But I've also, you know, when I started, it was just, of course, you

Kenny Bailey<br>:

know, you're not gonna like you said, you're not gonna like some of your earning it. You're working your way up,

Dustin Ortiz:

right? And then that's another so we would practice when we had practice after, we'd be in the pins, feeding them robbing them. Yeah, some of them are just that like, oh, yeah, job's done. Yeah. To eat now. It's like, Good job today. Yeah. Well, you kind of there were toes, by all means. But it's like, man, they're super like, dang, you don't walk into a pin and then try to you know, run after you. Now that would be like a bullfighters bowl. Right. So they breed these ones to bulk to some you'll you'll tie up and they just stand there. Yeah. I'm not feeling Yeah, exactly. It's you're not going to take that to a PBR event is bloodline, and all that good stuff. And then you have like a fighting bulls. They they're smaller, faster, more agile, and they will chase you down if you run in their pen. So that's their job. They do. And it's like, yeah, so the different breeds? Yeah, right. Interesting. Yeah.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

Are you do you feel like you're getting that same sort of adrenaline rush, that newness that you had, like you said, you've done fighting for quite a while you get you're getting a little burned out? Is the it's not necessary. The fight in itself is a business of fighting that feels like you

Dustin Ortiz:

get burned. Exactly. Yeah. I'm glad you said that. That's a great point. Because I think it is

Kenny Bailey<br>:

right you have to figure out the card, somebody gets injured, or something's going on. You're gonna you know, somebody's setting up money to take five and then that falls through. It's like, you just want to fight. I mean, that's right. It feels like on the bull riding, it seems from you like the, the feedback, the essence that you're getting is like you're excited, like, this is a whole world of not understanding what's going on. That is something that you have to conquer? Would that be a fair thing to say?

Dustin Ortiz:

Yeah, absolutely. And it's, it's, uh, I enjoy doing this stuff. The older that I get, kind of, like we were talking about earlier, where I don't get into that mindset of like, you're older, you need to settle down at get a job, you need to have family, you need to do this. And it's like, well, that's your vision of living life. Right. But mine is getting on this bowl that yeah, they could take me out or anybody that's within 10 feet. You know, it's like, yeah, just keeps that that drive of life really alive that I've heard fit fizzles out, you know, the older you get, the less testosterone, it's just, it's life, you know, like, 90 year old guy is not going to be itching to get on a bowl, you know, so I know that time is coming, and I'm gonna, I'm gonna get that shot of adrenaline or that rush of life wherever I can, as long as I can. Until I'm just not feeling it anymore. So yeah, it really does. And it's new. I like, you know, I like new things is, I don't like bad new things.

Tom Regal:

Challenging news, you want to learn you want to you have to mind you have to use your body, your physical, your active, it's, it's a lot of dopamine. I mean, it's like it's the adrenaline has gotta be

Kenny Bailey<br>:

fantastic. Yeah, like, the same skill set you have. And now Now you're like, you're a neophyte. When it comes to like the education of it to your point, you have the physical ability to do it. I mean, you're in great shape. You know what you're doing. You're, you know, your fight often. I mean, you can you can physically get on that boat. But yeah, it's your education in understanding the mastery of that. And it seems like that's what you get, like fed on like, oh, I can do that now. Now, I know, I can do that. Let's figure out how I do that better. How do I do it more efficiently? Do you stare down on the bowl to do you try to do do you do that? So we're

Dustin Ortiz:

cases and so my coach, Justin McBride, world champion, bowrider. Got Coach of the Year this year, we won as a team, the first ever, you know, Team Series and PBR. He told me, he told me this little trick that he would do so you have to adjust your rope. The rope is adjustable. So if you get a bigger bowl, you gotta loosen it up. And so because you want your rosin and where you hold the rope to match up every single time Yeah, so a smaller bowl, you're gonna you know, make your ropes smaller, shorter, and for a bigger rope or a bigger bowl, you know, you can adjust it right. So what do you would do as like a psychological mindset with him in the Pull, which is kind of funny, I thought it always when he got done riding and he would, you know, you clean all the rosin off your rope. So next time it's like it's not a built up junkie and whatever. And so when you put his rope back, you'd make it pretty big, right? So then he would go and he would put it on his bowl, they're like, this is your bowl, you're up and four or five, right? And he put it big. So when he put it on the bowl, and you always, you know, pull it as tight as you can to say, so you do it in the back, like five bowls up. So then once you get there, you know, it's already set. And then you can just adjust and go, right? And so he would make it bigger. So when he put it on the ball and tighten it up, he'd be like, Oh, you're not as big as I thought. So it's like

Kenny Bailey<br>:

psychological, and then he's telling himself, it's not that

Dustin Ortiz:

not that big of a deal. Right? So that he would, he would make it smaller and get it just like you like. So I kind of I kind of took that as like, that's cool. Yeah. And so I use things like that, or like, I like to kind of stand by him and be like, Oh, you're not that big. Yeah. Or, like, get up behind the shoots. Or I'm looking down at him. I'm like, small back. Yeah. Like, your horns aren't that big? And like, kind of talk to him? Like, yeah, you know, it's like, but then once I'm in there, I'm like he is yeah, let's do this. Yeah, we'll see. You

Kenny Bailey<br>:

gotta respect

Dustin Ortiz:

him a little bit and try to you know, like, yeah, like, get them ready. But yeah, so I, I kind of do that a little bit. So

Kenny Bailey<br>:

PBR is now first year, they've gone to a team event. Right. So and I think it seems some of the feedback is really, really popular.

Dustin Ortiz:

Yeah, I think so I think, you know, with anything you kind of have those old school guys are a little stuck in their ways. Like, this is an audience, from an audience and from a, you know, America loves team sport. Yeah. And it's easier to get behind a team than it is an individual. You know, like, if you think of all the individual stuff, it's not the most popular thing watched, right? So basketball, football, you know, so on and so forth. Golf is not, you know, you definitely had your fans, but it's not like

Kenny Bailey<br>:

our new Golf Course is actually going to team events. Right. So they're, you know, USA

Tom Regal:

CUP. Davis. The other stuff, same thing.

Dustin Ortiz:

For a team event. Yeah. NASCAR or race car, in general. So, um, but yeah, I think the feedback has been has been really good so far.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

My question to you is that I mean, you like, since grade school, you have been doing an individual sport. Yeah. Right. Now, you're not just on it. And so you're still doing an individual thing, right? You individually have to do well, right, Bull, but now you're participating in points for not just you, but your team. How is that? Are you doing okay with that idea of a team? Do you have to adjust your mindset on that? Is that something? Yeah, that's because it's literally a new thing. You've been you write for 30 years, right? Yeah. So now you're suddenly Yeah, they're not yours? Yeah. Sorry.

Dustin Ortiz:

No, 22 2018? Yeah. So actually, I had that this exact conversation with my dad. And I just kind of looked at as like, Man, this is just helping me grow as a person. Yeah. Right. Because I've always just kind of looked out for myself, or the people that I have around me, you know, I'm very aware of what's going on. And I take care of people in my circle, right. And I've never been on a team never really liked being on team because I'm like you exactly. But right, because wrestling was like that it was an individual thing. But we would compete against another team. That's true as a team. You could win your match, but then we could still lose. Dude, if you would have won. You know, so going into it this year, I honestly, I just kind of got to see like how this all worked. Every it was new to everybody. Sure. Right. And I never I wrote in some of the lower level events, but I didn't ride with the actual team. So I was just kind of there to help support. They needed something. I'd be there because I'm just learning and taking it all in. But we had we had lost some ones where I'm like, Dude, you had that? Yeah. I would tell them like in a nice way. Yeah, like, Dude, you kind of gave up. You're right. But at being a writer, you do understand happens just like that, right? So it's like, I get it. It takes one second for the bowl, just to roll it shoulders, and you're off. And as soon as they shoot out left when you think they're going right. You're done. You're flying again. Right. So this year was fun, just because our team did come together and get closer as the season went on. Well, to your

Kenny Bailey<br>:

point you really want to individual in our first time becoming a team Right, right. Right one right. So

Dustin Ortiz:

we did with the team name, Nashville stampede, Nashville stampede, which was like how I got picked up right here. The team Yeah, from where I'm from. So yeah, it's definitely a learning experience. But I chose to let it make me better as a person and start to encourage people and And I've always done for, for teammates, you know, like on the same fight team or training on the same gym, but this is like, it's alright dude. Next one next weekend. Yeah,

Kenny Bailey<br>:

well, I think to your point, it's not just hey, you know, I'm playing basketball, I'm playing against another person. I mean, yeah, the level of intensity that you're dealing with to, like you're dealing with people's like, literally lives, right? I mean, I want to make it dramatic. But that's a very snotty, pissed off bowl that if bad things happen, you're going to the hospital, if I get a playing basketball and get a hip check. Yeah, that's one thing. I'm pissed off. But I mean, you're gonna be I think there's got to be more of a bonding moment on that one, because you are dealing with such a high risk. Sport. Right, right.

Dustin Ortiz:

And, and so for me, I'm like, I want to be the risk taker. Right. So yeah, I don't know. Like, okay, so this is probably weird. But like, when we won, Yeah, everybody's running around and jumping in. And I was, of course, happy for all of our riders, because I've seen them train consistently worked better and, and not make rides throughout the year. And I'm like, Dude, you're world champion. And, you know, we as a team should be doing better because we were almost in last, like, the whole year, you know? And it's like, if we can just all put it together, we would be unstoppable. Right? And so we were progressively getting there. And then we were, we were able to put it together when it meant the most. I'm like, wow, this is what real high level guys do. And we just showed that right? These dudes are high level, they're very disciplined, that take this serious, and when it meant the most, they rose to the occasion, which gave me so much respect for the team and the coaches. You know, everybody that was involved in it, right? And so that was amazing. But I was like, I didn't get to write. Like, I'm happy. But like, I wanted to participate. Sure. I feel like you got everybody like dude, you were part of the team. You know, you showed up you practice you encourage guys like, like, be happy with it, but just who I am doesn't really allow me to really feel that that success that these other guys really deserved. So that's the goal. Coming? Yes. Like, you're not feeling good. I don't think you're let me go. Yeah,

Kenny Bailey<br>:

so don't give me any shit. It'd been a an MMA guy. I mean, do they kind of like try to bust you a little bit on that? Because you're because you're like, Oh, well, this guy, you know, like, yeah, I have to have to think that they're trying, I think

Dustin Ortiz:

it'll be once if, if you have a higher person when they do see me again, right? Because I was just there for a year or for that season for last season from July to November. So one of the coolest moments, probably in my entire life was, you know, these guys don't really know who I am. They're not understanding why I'm here. Why did I get paid to be on a professional bull riding team? I have no bull riding experience. And they're like, Oh, he's a fighter. Okay, that doesn't really mean anything. Then they find out that I'm in the UFC or I was in the UFC. Yeah. Now the level of respect goes way up, looking on YouTube videos, knowing who I am and what I've done, and a lot of bowriders UFC fans, right? They're like, they're like, Okay, now I'm gaining the respect of my team. Because one I'm showing up getting on bowls, then they're like, You should not be getting by coach like, Yeah, you're good. Yeah, right. So they, I have now gained their respect of willingness and wanting to get on these polls that I read in real life, I should not be getting on, you're just not at this level. It's like, I know you have five skills, but it's like me putting you in a cage and saying, Keep your hands up.

Tom Regal:

Just eight seconds, you just gotta hold on for a second.

Dustin Ortiz:

So that's kind of what I was doing. And they they had respect for that. And then when they saw that I was in the UFC and I'm making this transition, then it goes goes up even more. So that took kind of half the season to figure out. And then so once my team was like, Hey, we're rolling with his bad. We're all standing behind the chutes. And before the show starts, you know that everybody's in the back and then they call out by teams, and everybody goes and they do the fireworks and fire and everything and they're passing my phone around showing all these guys you know that my fights and they're like you noticed my fastest knockout or my head kick over Nicolau Mateus I was I think I was a huge under 100. But in Canada, sorry, I haven't blanked and so yeah, they're just all passing around and it was just like now I'm accepted. Yeah. Now these other guys from other teams are like hey, you know if you want to come train with us, we got these bulls, you know, we will work out well. Zane will ride horseback, you know? bareback. Yeah, that gives you a kind of a feel of like a real animal. Like, all these things just and I was like, wow, now I feel like you've been welcomed and I've been welcomed in right because I you know, everybody's like, why don't you wear like a A big book, you know, and I'm like, You got? Yeah, I got one that my grandpa gave me. I'm gonna wear that and which I did all season. Yeah. But it's I got I don't want something until I really earned it. Yeah, you know, and I think there's a little respect there. It's kind of like, at first guys are looking at I'd be like what is that? Yeah, and

Kenny Bailey<br>:

I think you're working too, right? Because yeah, because of your work ethic maybe, as you said there, you know, the work ethic may not be the same where you can kind of bring that in. Yeah, you're pointing because you're physically getting prepared to be able to do these things. It's it's not an accident, right? You spray decades, you know, worried about making sure you're in that shape to be able to do that.

Dustin Ortiz:

Yeah, yeah, absolutely. So I'm showing up I'm putting the work in shaking hands, guys are respecting it, they see where I'm at. They see that I'm working. They see that I want it and I just kind of stood back and just like, hey, I'm not I'm not you'd like to be able to

Tom Regal:

write and say, I'm a us kind of a better yeah, step aside, step aside.

Dustin Ortiz:

For and that's one thing about like, creating the character and stuff. I kind of, I don't know if I said this. Exactly. It's just so much cooler when I meet somebody, and just have like, a genuine conversation. And then they find out like, yeah, you know, because what you've done, I know you for you. Yeah, now you're finding out instead of like this pre gumption of like, Oh, this guy, because I know, like, I've met guys where they're a star, or they have a name or a lot of following. And so I automatically not put them on a pedestal, but I'm like, Oh, that's so and so. But I don't know them. Yeah. So it's just so much cooler meeting somebody. And I'm like, Oh, you do this and that. Yeah, dude, that's awesome. Like, that's really cool. So it's that's cool that that all happened organically now this year. You know if I can get to that level, which I really believe that I can. Yeah. Headed back to Texas on tomorrow, going tomorrow. Tomorrow. Yeah. So I think I can get there. And then you know, hopefully fingers crossed and all the work hard work puts in and pays off. I'll be riding at the Bridgestone and August will be the team. That's that's a goal of mine this year, or next, God Willing that I can walk by? arms and shoulders attached? Yeah. Yeah, just all hard work and respect where it's cool, where it's giving, you know,

Kenny Bailey<br>:

I'm a huge fan of yours, just as person not just as a fighter, but just appreciate you approach stuff the way like you're, you're humble when you need to be, you know, cocky, when you can be that kind of thing. Yeah, it's awesome. And I know I'm a big fan. I'm rooting for you. So

Tom Regal:

appreciate it. Yeah. It's been fantastic to get to know you're, and I'm like, We'll be there in August, for sure. We'll try to get tickets and go absolutely, yeah, gotta follow this through and kind of watch all

Dustin Ortiz:

I'm saying, I'm all in it. Because I've had other opportunities outside of fighting in bull riding, right, which would, would be in 34 years old, which would make sense of kind of like, okay, this, this is better, you make more money, blah, blah, blah, but like, I'm gonna see this through. Yeah, I started this, and this wakes me up in the morning. You know, I've done plenty of jobs where I'm just like, I've never like woke up and been like, Oh, I gotta go train to fight. You know, it's always been like, oh yeah, let's go do this. Yeah, I'm gonna work this guy. So that's how bull riding is for me right now. Yeah, as long as that's there. I'm going to continue to chase that down.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

Oh, man. Well, we appreciate you. Coming on taking time. I know you're busy. Like you said, you're heading down to Texas to get kind of get ready to go. So

Tom Regal:

yeah, thank you so much. We appreciate your your time and everything. Tons of respect. Tons of respect on like, everything. So appreciate it all. Everyone, give us your likes and thumbs up five stars, all the good stuff that helps the algorithm grow. And more people can see this will be on our YouTube channel for those who can actually see it. So hopefully, if the cameras are working properly. We'd like to thank the coffee shop here at second and bridge in downtown Franklin, which we love their coffee. We're dealing with the sound and it's getting a little better. But we love the environment. We have the place. So thank you all again. Appreciate you all and until the next one. We'll catch you then.