Athletes in Motion

Karelle Laurent - The Power of Nutrition - Athetes in Motion Podcast

July 09, 2024 Tom Regal and Kenny Bailey Season 4 Episode 70
Karelle Laurent - The Power of Nutrition - Athetes in Motion Podcast
Athletes in Motion
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Athletes in Motion
Karelle Laurent - The Power of Nutrition - Athetes in Motion Podcast
Jul 09, 2024 Season 4 Episode 70
Tom Regal and Kenny Bailey

Send us a Text Message.

We chat with Karelle Laurent about personalized nutrition plans, identifying triggers for inflammation, and the challenges of implementing health and nutrition changes in a societal context that promotes unhealthy habits.

Karelle is a fully qualified Nutritional Therapist with a specialization around Integrative Sports Nutrition with the prestigious Institute for Optimum Nutrition and Center for Integrative Sports Nutrition in London. 

She utilizes the power of nutrition to nourish and heal the body in order to attain optimum healt - And also hosts amazing cycling retreats in Portugal! 

www.karellelaurentnutrition.com
Instagram @karellelaurentnutrition
You can sign up for a free discovery call www.karellelaurentnutrition.com/contactme 

 

The next Cycling Nutrition & Wellness retreats dates are : 

  • 9-15th Nov 2024 
  • 29th March – 4th April 2025 - On Gravel
  • 10-16th May 2025
  • 8-14th November 2025

On the Web:
www.athletesinmotionpodcast.com

On YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/@AthletesinMotionPodcast

Episodes Sponsored by:
TriTomR Endurance LLC
www.tritomrendurance.com

Show Notes Transcript

Send us a Text Message.

We chat with Karelle Laurent about personalized nutrition plans, identifying triggers for inflammation, and the challenges of implementing health and nutrition changes in a societal context that promotes unhealthy habits.

Karelle is a fully qualified Nutritional Therapist with a specialization around Integrative Sports Nutrition with the prestigious Institute for Optimum Nutrition and Center for Integrative Sports Nutrition in London. 

She utilizes the power of nutrition to nourish and heal the body in order to attain optimum healt - And also hosts amazing cycling retreats in Portugal! 

www.karellelaurentnutrition.com
Instagram @karellelaurentnutrition
You can sign up for a free discovery call www.karellelaurentnutrition.com/contactme 

 

The next Cycling Nutrition & Wellness retreats dates are : 

  • 9-15th Nov 2024 
  • 29th March – 4th April 2025 - On Gravel
  • 10-16th May 2025
  • 8-14th November 2025

On the Web:
www.athletesinmotionpodcast.com

On YouTube:
https://www.youtube.com/@AthletesinMotionPodcast

Episodes Sponsored by:
TriTomR Endurance LLC
www.tritomrendurance.com

Tom Regal:

Music.

Narrator:

Welcome to the athletes in motion podcast from race to recovery with your hosts Tom regal and Kenny Bailey. You

Tom Regal:

Hey, Kenny, how are you?

Kenny Bailey<br>:

I'm fantastic. Tom How are you,

Tom Regal:

I'm fantastic as well. We have a wonderful guest. Would like to welcome Karel Laurent to the show today. Thank you for joining us. She is a nutritional therapist that specializes in integrative sports nutrition and works with the Institute, this is a long name here, Institute for optimum nutrition, and Center for Integrative sports nutrition in London, currently residing in Portugal, originally from France, and has been everywhere else in between. So we're really excited to have you on welcome Carol. This is wonderful welcome through Leo. So Leo Silva is one of our triathletes journey athletes, and Karel is working with Leo on his journey, and he connected it was nice enough to connect us, and Carol is nice enough to join us to talk about all things nutrition and sports and endurance, who and you're also a triathlete as well, right? Yes, aha. Okay, we've got that as well. So tell us about yourself. Welcome and tell us about yourself.

Karelle Laurent:

Thank you, Tom, and Thanks Kelly for having me on the on the podcast. It's so lovely to be to be with you today. Yes, well, I think you've got it all right. So yes, I am French. I left France. We left France with my husband about 25 years ago, and we live in the UK. We live in Australia, we live in Singapore, and we now live in Portugal. My husband is French, Portuguese, and we absolutely love Portugal. The south of Portugal, the area is absolutely beautiful, best place to cycle. And we'll come back to that. And then on the way, yes, I used to be a fashion working in fashion industry, and shortly after my second child, he was suffering from a lot of allergies, infection I was I was burning out as well because my husband was traveling a lot and it was just a lot going on. And thought to myself, I just need to, you know, I'm sitting in the doctor's office, and it's telling me what I need to do. And I'm, I'm quite knowledgeable that I'm kind of taking it on mobile, but I don't, I don't have it doesn't come from me, as I don't have the loanage enough to say yes or to say no. So I thought, this is just not right. I can't do this. I need to. I need to learn more. And so I started looking at nutrition. I've always really be I wanted to be a doctor growing up, but then I thought, comedy, this is not good for me. I'm not so good at school. So I came back into into really trying to, you know, satisfy my learning journey into nutrition, into well being into health, but also being able to educate my children about the future their lives, and it's really important part of our life, right? The well being health, longevity. Now we talk a lot about longevity. We don't start working on longevity when we are 65 years old. We probably very lucky. Physics said, so you need to start earlier. So yeah, one thing back to another. I signed up into an online school so the Institute for optimum nutrition, I looked so much, but it was really the good space for me to be able to do my own research and have my own opinion. It wasn't a textbook type of school where we say to you, this is what people need to have for breakfast. This is what people need to eat. It was very much like, Well, do you think people need to be vegan, or do you think people need to be omnivore, and you need to now write an essay and find some research and find your your you know your opinion, and you need to prove your point on both. So I really was quite fascinating with that aspect. However, I still had on the side. I've grown up with in a household where sports was really important, not in a competitive level, but my dad was very, very active, and we were always doing in the summer when I was a little girl, we would go on holiday in shamanics, for example, and walk up the mountain while all of my my friends would go to the beach. And I will always say to my dad, what have I done wrong? For torture. And in the winter, we go back to the same place and we ski down information. And so it was always really active. However, I must say, I'm joking, and I always see him about that. But there was always horse riding, not just going horse riding, but going several days horse riding, or we did car racing. I actually grew up doing being my dad's co pilot. There you go. So, yeah, it was amazing. It was so always sports was important, but I've never been, I would say, still not a top age grouper, but I love sports, and it's really part of me. So the nutrition, the sports, and all my friends were triathletes, it's kind of runs in the water in Singapore and and someone said to me, you don't be great if you actually could be a nutritionist for us trying, because when we when something's wrong, and we go to the doctor automatically, even if it's not related to that, they say you need to stop training. And and I was like, Okay, I'll find about, think about it. So when I finished my my, my my course, my diploma. Then I remember also doing the diploma, and one of the tutors said, oh, you know, you work with weight loss, you work with oncology, you work with all of this. One you should not work with is triad. Got a point, unageable. And I was like, that's really fun, actually, because actually my consultation, and I compare to, I have a mentorship program, is my consultation. I feel like I level up to the people that I speak with. They have done their research, they know what they talking about. They would still have question, and they want to dig more, but it just kind of resonate to them. So it's and I love that, because I love the fact that I can still, I still give them information, and they're still learning, even though, if they already have the loads of research, and they already very knowledgeable and interested about their health, right? Um, so, yeah, so it was definitely the population.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

So is it because triathletes, they just feel like they know what they're doing anyway, so they'll challenge you on stuff, or is it more they're hard headed? Sometimes

Karelle Laurent:

it's a good question. Sometimes people come and be like, okay, you know, Karelle, I know about this. I've done some research, what do you think about that? And I'm like, wow. Okay, yeah, so,

Kenny Bailey<br>:

so you were, you were an active person prior, right? Like you said you were doing a lot of activities, co race car, driver, how cool is that?

Tom Regal:

That's awesome.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

So I'm sorry, I'm just listening to your background. It's like, I'm really active in sports. I do nutrition, I did fashion, and I'm like, my gosh. So when, when you you had a preconceived notion of nutrition before you walked into the courses, once you've gotten out, were you, were you surprised at sort of the difference between what you did, or did you intrinsically think you got it? Now you just it's it's validated, if you will.

Karelle Laurent:

It's a really good question. I definitely learned a lot. So in terms of food, particularly, I understood more the impact on the body system. I understood more also how the body works, and I think long term, the big picture, and that was it. So the reason why, also, I picked this particular school, it's we work on the functional medicine. I don't know if you've heard about functional medicine, yeah, hey, man, and all of this and, and that's really interesting, because, for example, if you take the example of an athlete, I would have an athlete comes and singing, and it's like, oh, you know, cryo, oh, I always have injury, but that's, that's always me. I always have, you know, an injury in my calf, or it's my foot, and I'm like, hold on a minute. It's inclined, right? So that's not localized. So if you have an injury, okay, you train. So that's just going to push, push it a little bit to the extreme, but there is an inflammation in the gut, and that's what functional is. Medicine is incredible about and that's maybe my biggest takeaway of the school was really to be able to take that step back and being investigating the big picture and be like, you know, our body is not just you don't have a border between your legs and the rest of the body. So if you have an inflammation, it's not just localized, it's everywhere. So why? So why do we have an inflammation? It may not be because. Been running, but maybe there's something happening with your gut. Maybe it's an influence of, you know, where you live, your environment, maybe the food you've been eating, maybe you know, some prior medication you've been taking, and that's really the part when I work with clients, where it's really interesting, and the light bulb moment of, you know, you have habits that you will have, and sometimes I explain something to a client, and I can see that this is happening, and it's a light bulb moment where they realize what's going on. And I've had it the past in my journey, and that's where you just like you're making a difference, right?

Tom Regal:

Yeah. And I think the biggest issue, I'd say issues, not the right word, but, but essentially, it's different for everyone. So there is no the inflammation that you're having is caused by something different from the inflammation that I'm having, or Kenny's having. It's like it's going on there. And I think part of the journey is finding what that trigger is for you, and then trying to adjust for that. Now, how do you, how do you deal with athletes that come in or and you work with non athletes as well as athletes? I'm, I'm assuming that. So when you're, when you're,

Kenny Bailey<br>:

yeah, we don't care about the non athletes. Yeah, well, everyone's,

Tom Regal:

we feel everyone's an athlete,

Kenny Bailey<br>:

everyone's an athlete.

Tom Regal:

Yeah, yeah, normal people. So when they come in and so you identify something, maybe it's a habit, maybe it's a food that they're eating. All of that, do you get people that are resistant to change? It's like, what if they really like that, that food or something that's triggering this, and you figured out that that's what it is. How do you, how do you walk them through that realization of like, you gotta have to change a habit to be healthier, and that habit you really love,

Karelle Laurent:

yeah, and you're right. And I think, you know, as we age, we don't like change. I don't like change towards you know, we it's also difficult, but you would have different kind of type of people as well. There's people who are scared of change, and it creates anxiety, and you need to be really aware of that. And usually I would realize that in the in the initial session, in the process, and then you just go a little bit more. You go with caution in the way you will introduce change habits. So if you work with non athlete, and non athletes, usually, and at school, they would say, Oh, you do only a couple of change at the time because it's hard for people to implement change. But one thing with athletes, if I do a couple of changes, they would be like, Okay, so can we move on? Let's go. Let's go a very different population. So you really need to work with the type of person that you have. And sometimes it's a change in between. It's maybe, you know, I'm going to take an example of someone who drinks soda, for example, and drinks maybe three or four soda a day. And obviously, in the best of the world, we don't drink soda at all, but that's not the realistic approach for someone who is going to be drinking maybe for soda a day. So then you would start into, you know, how is your sleep? Oh, yeah, it's good, but it's not okay. So, and then you have a couple of more ideas and suggestion, maybe cravings, maybe afternoon, a bit more lack of energy, then it'd be like, Okay, how about we just change one and then another one. So you go to your own rhythm, and usually to change the habits. You know, it just happens. And when you do the follow up session like, Oh, honey, it's not anymore, excuse me, it's good. You know, actually, it felt, yeah, it's not even a problem. It was a problem. We talked about it for 40 minutes. So we, we forget. You forget. You know, you've done something for several years, and you suddenly stop doing it, and you're like, oh, okay, but there is sometimes things that I go a lot into, I'm quite realistic of the way we live. I could be French as well, but it you know, I'm not being French or being a nutritionist. I don't live in a bubble of we eat kale for dinner every day. I've got kids, they want to eat pizza. You know, it's this is just a normal world. And so I'm going into someone's life and help them. So tell me, where do you get what you have around you? What are the surroundings? What do you like, what don't you like? And then we just make suggestion like this. It's not just me, but you would make a suggestion, and it's a conversation, and it's a really nice exchange. And sometimes a suggestion comes from the clients, and that's what's beautiful, because it just it's easier to implement.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

So I find food, food is a fascinating kind of challenge, right? Well, actually, yeah, because if it's just yeah, if it's just fuel, it would be one thing, right? If we just use it as a as you know, like drinking water. But food is tied to family. It's tied to society. It's tied to pleasure. You know, we eat at a funeral, we eat at a wedding, we eat at, you know, birthday parties, we eat at pool parties, or we just, you know, eat for breakfast. So it's tied to so many societal things that I think it's fascinating. We can't just simply say, well, just don't eat that, or don't eat that. For example, to your point, you may want someone to eat more nutritious food, but maybe their spouse and their kids are eating less, you know, pizzas and all that. So trying to incorporate a healthy diet in a world where none of that is supported, I guess you know, because they want to eat their food. You do? Do you? How do you handle that kind of societal or do you see that societal sort of pressure, and how do you navigate that and culturally?

Karelle Laurent:

Because I work with clients in different parts of the world, it has translated very differently in Middle East or in Europe. It's so different. So I'm feeling I'm really fortunate that, because I have been traveling a lot for living or just traveling for leisure, I know a little bit, and I've got a really good perception on culturally, how food is important into a society and and that is a valuable point for me to be able to translate that in a consultation and understand, understand that, you know, living in the US or living in New York, you have a lot more temptation than I would have living in yoga, because you walk down the street, this the smell I remember when I lived in the UK, my mom would say to me, it's incredible. I know where I am. I don't need to open the eyes. I smell it smells cinnamon everywhere. You don't realize that. And you know the blue zone. Have you heard about the blue zone? Right? And he talks a lot about that in his book. I remember that was really relevant to me, because the environment you are in is going to be the recipe for success, or no or make life so much harder for you in terms of being able to to make the change you want. Because sometimes wanting to make the change is not enough. The Willpower is a great tool, but it's not enough to be able to make those changes, because there's so many more barrier, right? So we've just got to realize the environment. So yeah, it's food is very bright. Food is interlinked to some and emotionally as well. Emotional food is just a huge factor. Yeah,

Kenny Bailey<br>:

it's just an amazing challenge. I have always seen, you know, even me, and I'm guilty of it, we may have friends that come over that are vegan, and I'm not a vegan. I'm not I'm I like my meat, and, you know, having to cook for purely vegan sometimes is difficult for me to say, ah, you know. Or if they order, it's always, you know, and I've got to be a lot more supportive, right? Or when they order, you know, can you have it without this? And can it, does it come with this? Does it come with that, like, just order, just order, right? But, you know, you just, you have to be a little bit more patient on that.

Karelle Laurent:

It's, it's, and it's different because it's more difficult for you because you're not used to it.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

Yeah, exactly it would be. Imagine

Karelle Laurent:

if you suddenly, you know, it would be very difficult for you to implement that, because it's changed. Any changes are going to be traumatic in some extent, right? So before for them, it's not a problem, because they're used to that. So they would be like, just get me some vegetables and some this.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

Yeah, for me, it would be difficult. So when, when people come to you, do they come to you? Is it, is it sort of a, is there a theme? It's like, I'm having a sleep problem, or I'm having a GI problem, or I'm having a nutrition problem or a hydration problem. When did, when do they when do you get the call?

Karelle Laurent:

So interesting? So I often, I actually it's, it's interesting, because I often have, so I do discovery call. You have a free this 15 discovery call. I'll post a link later. I'll send you the link. But and I often have the wording is often going to be looking for support. I've heard about you from this or this, and looking for support because I have a race so performance. And then we start talking, I would say one times out of two that gold becomes secondary. And then as we start talking even even discovery code, it will. Be like other goal, a more important goal to that client. It could be, you know, trying to lose weight, but cry out, I'm trying so hard, and it's not working. I don't understand. I'm careful. Is what I eat? I train a lot. I've been training for years. I can't lose weight. That's that. Or it could be something like, I never know what to eat. I do this, but it's a little bit like I'm insecure what I'm doing, and that's a really important point I often have that I just need you to tell me, am I doing this right? Should I have this for breakfast? Should I be fasting? Should I not be fasting? Should I be vegan? Should I not be Yeah, and that's a really big offer. It's a big question, because and, and it's something you mentioned in your email Tom, is, how do you people will relate into you know, what you hear on social media? And that's, I think it creates a lot of insecurity amongst ourselves, amongst everyone, because you started thinking like, Oh, should I be doing that? But they're doing that. So should I be and I try to take that off that pressure. So we look at someone's habits, and then we just and then it becomes very clear. So then they have the the power empower people to be like, yeah, actually, what you were doing was right all the other way around. Um, oh, someone would come with a more personal health problematic. It could be gi issue, allergy, food intolerance. It could be, you know, hormone changes as well. I work with women, and there's usually a big change. Your performance starts to peak, or you you suddenly to drop, or you suddenly don't sleep well, or even a men and women are suddenly saying, you know, I can't reach my I just can't reach my, uh, my target that my coach is giving me. I'm really I'm tired. I don't know what's going on so, but when they are that moment, they are already able to, you know, to know that it's a link with the food, because sometimes they don't make that link. So when they make they already have knowledge there. Yes. So it's really interesting. And lately I've had, I would say, in the last couple of years, I've had a few athletes, or even adults who has been recently diagnosed with ADHD and and that's really interesting. So I'm doing a lot more training on neurodiversity. The impact, I think it's, it's it's really fascinating to see how that also creates a huge driver in the relationship we have with food, with how we should be and how, you know what we should be eating. So that's that's really, really interesting as well. That's

Tom Regal:

fascinating because I, I wouldn't have even guessed that there'd be a link to food with that and and, like, I should know that, right? We should know that the food links to just about to everything it does to everything. So, yeah, I wouldn't have thought ADHD and and linking that to food and being able to help you cope a little bit with with better food choices and timing and all of that, that's that I'm fascinated to learn more about. That.

Karelle Laurent:

Yeah, I think it's because we identify ADHD as the old idea of you have a child who has hyperactivity, of that naughty child has ADHD, but we know it's so much more than that. Now we've learned so much more. And when adults find out, it's sometimes, you know, because they they just it's they have a hard time to organize themselves. So they have that hard time to follow instruction. And it could be following a plan, or it could be just thinking about, you know, cooking, or it could be about so many more aspects. And then, as such, the food, it's also the texture, it's also maybe focusing too much on not eating carbs at all, or eating too much cars or, you know, so then we go to the extreme as well, and that's where it's not even one example, and that's why it's really fascinating to learn more, because we know that it's just neurodiversity is going to be a million different facets and a million different translation for people. So that's why it's yes. So it's fascinating discoveries coming up. So, really interesting, nice.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

It seems like, you know, there's a diet a week that occurs, right? And you mentioned that people go online. It seems like, Okay, I'm going to be a carnivore now, or, you know, and you'll get quick, you know, results, or I'm going to be totally vegan, or I've decided that, you know, this particular diet, you know, I always thought, you know, the Mediterranean diet seemed to be the nice combination of both. Is, is there a, do you see more or less of a particular kind that's popping up lately? Or is it, right? It's all over the. Work.

Karelle Laurent:

It's just, it's, I think it's, it's the influence of all of this, and it's so hard because I even try myself on social media to try to not go into this of telling people what to do, yeah, and because I think it just is that window you see this, but then it's so much harder to show the rest of it. Yes, vegan diet, all of them are going to be great on a certain extent, and they have all of them studied that supports them. But are they the right approach for you? Are they the right approach for me at that moment of your life? So you know, being vegan is all great, but is it the right moment to do this? I That's

Kenny Bailey<br>:

a good point. I like what you're saying when it's you know, you could have a diet when you were 30, but maybe not the diet when you're 50. Yeah, that's an excellent point. Yeah,

Karelle Laurent:

different way of living. In a personal example, I used to be vegetarian for many, many years and being into perimenopause, I realized it was like, no, actually, that doesn't work with me anymore. It just doesn't I need to have a better support, and I need to have more planning intake. And it's a challenge. I'm telling you, this is a challenge, but actually, I live in a place of in a world where I have access to really good quality and meat, but it's, but it doesn't mean eating the you know, it could be fasted in your off season. So often clients would say, oh, but I'm on the fasting diet, yes, but when you're training for Fulani or Nan perhaps, could we delay the fasting to your eating a lot for

Tom Regal:

Christmas, eat, eat, eat. If you're training for big, ugly races, eat. Yeah, that's

Karelle Laurent:

right, it's getting the right timing. So yes, there's hundreds and 1000s of studies supporting every type of diet, and I'm not going to say they're not good. They just have a moment, a time and a timing, and they will be personalized.

Tom Regal:

Yeah, and we're all looking for the quick, easy answer, right? It's just do, just do this. And, and my favorite term is game changer. This is the this was a game changer for me. I ate this protein powder, and it was a game changer. And it's just like it. There is no simple one pill answer. There is no magical thing that you just do this and everything is perfect. It's a mixture of things. And

Karelle Laurent:

that's right, and I think it's often a takeaway as well that you know, I would also have say a client saying, okay, so what is the supplement I need to take? But just tell me, I will take it, but it doesn't work like this. And I think for years, some some clients, would say I used to get away with just eating whatever I want. But then there's a moment I realized had to actually work on eating the right food. And it doesn't again, it doesn't mean having a perfect diet. It just, you know, nourishing your body around your training, nourishing your body when you are increasing the intensity of your of your training, ramping up for a rate. It just simply means that it just, you know, you're not it's watering a plan that you're trying to grow in the desert, if you're doing water, it's kind of dark,

Kenny Bailey<br>:

there you go. Yeah, I don't think you can talk about nutrition and in sort of supplements, unless you talk about GLP ones, right? And the rise of those is that a US, is that a kind of a US centric, sort of fever and pitch in which everyone's trying to get on glps to easily lose weight. Or, do you see that globally, is it, is it just, is the impact more US centric, or is it led? Or is it, oh, I

Karelle Laurent:

think I think it's, yeah, I see it here in in younger

Kenny Bailey<br>:

Oh, really, yeah, it's,

Karelle Laurent:

it's global because, yeah, it's global. I won't say it's, I think it's also, you know, you hear a lot more from the US, but, yeah, it's a global thing. I don't have it so much. I don't have so many clients requesting or talking about it. Yes, yes, I had one a couple of years ago. But it's not something that comes up. Because I think, I think we speak a lot about taking the time, just as you know, we always try to reinforce the fact that you wouldn't start running a marathon from day one, right? You don't walk out of the door running a marathon, you know? Well, maybe one guy,

Kenny Bailey<br>:

and they're usually Crazy, right? So

Karelle Laurent:

you gotta put in the work, and the work is the foundation. Now, I think with the. Type of medication, it has a purpose for a population. Don't get me wrong. I'm not saying it's wrong, but just to confirm that we're talking about using it for people that could just who are having lower BMI, right? So when people do require I think it's it's amazing that they have that the science have provided an opportunity for them to be able to reduce the markers of, you know, and improve longevity on so many aspects, yeah, and

Kenny Bailey<br>:

I think it's really important just, you know, again, I'm a you know, if that's something that you want or something that you need, you got to wrap a habit around it, because you're not just going to be an injectable and then eat Doritos and eat burritos and eat, you know, and continue to be sedentary and expect, you know, some miracle. I mean, there's got to be a habit if it helps you get to a habit change. Awesome. In other words, if you get more confident, or you feel like you can walk more, that that's great. But yeah, anyway, I had to ask about that, just because, you know, it's, it's prevalent all over the place, right?

Karelle Laurent:

It is. And I've been listening to a couple of podcasts in the last couple of weeks on that topic because I thought it was really interesting actually, to to know more. And you're right. I think if it can help someone to gain a better quality of life, by means, I think it's just ultimately, we need to have

Kenny Bailey<br>:

more positive outcome for

Tom Regal:

Yeah, you see a lot of other differences between Europe and the rest of the world and the US market when it comes to food. I've talked to I've talked to people that I've met through the years that were always say they came from Brazil, they came from someone else, and they say they went and got vegetables or they got fruit, and it just didn't have the same flavor. It didn't have the same so there's a difference in our farming product that we that we deliver, and our food processing and manufacturing. How big a difference is that? I mean, I've noticed it when I've traveled to Europe a couple of times where the food just, I don't know, maybe it was because I was there. It just tasted better, but there was more flavor to certain things in regards to here. So what other differences do you see?

Karelle Laurent:

I think it's farm to table. Um, it's that ratio, right? I'm sure in the US, if you are in an area where you have access to farmers small production, and you will have amazing quality of food. But I think it's more, rather than saying geographically, I think it's more down to how the access we have and where we're purchasing our product and our produce. Asia was particularly difficult because Singapore being a small city, country slash city Island, some have a lot of land, so everything is imported. Because it's imported, it spends a lot of time in those freezing condition to be transported, right? So, so tomato have no taste, they just be bland. Um, raspberry don't have much taste, but we have access to good meat from Australia, for example. So that was that was fine, um, but here in Portugal, raspberries are out of this world. They're just so delicious because producer coming from here, and they are also, you know, often remind clients to go seasonal, even if you are in a place where you will have and we have this supermarket where you have everything, but look, where is this coming from? Where is this coming? Is it coming from? Because sometimes you would have bananas, even just bananas, your bananas will come from the country, locally, the country right next to you. Or is it coming from the other side of the world? And if you pick the attention, if you look and you suddenly like, why would I have a banana that comes from being in Europe, New Zealand? Why can get a banana that comes from Madeira? Obviously, banana coming from Madeira is sometimes the price. It's difficult to say if it's less expensive or more expensive, it's definitely going to have a better flavor. Definitely have a better flavor. It just, it's just doing those little things that would be quite important. I would really recommend people to start doing that. And then you realize, oh, wow, the produce is the taste is different, right? Maybe it could go to the markets. There's only one day of a week where there's a market, but you guys in the US, there's so many farmers markets.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

Yeah, you get seasonal stuff. You're supporting the local farmer. I mean, it's good all the way around, right? It's just, rather than, you know, the big corporate man that, like you said, we're getting stuff imported, and then

Karelle Laurent:

it has a good credit. It's handy. Sometimes you you have to go by writing on a Saturday because. You're a coach kid, you know, right? And you can't go

Kenny Bailey<br>:

to the market exactly, or in the middle of a race, and I can look at it go, where is this banana from? I know I'm doing an Ironman right now, but is it so local? You have a local if you could, where do these M M's at exactly? One

Tom Regal:

of the reasons we landed here, when my wife and I moved to Tennessee and to Franco Tennessee, was there was local farms to get our meats and eggs and everything. And I got to tell you, I have a hard time when we don't get to the farms to get the meats, to go to the grocery store and get something because it's just even their top tier meats in the grocery stores just don't have the flavor, just don't come anywhere close, and it's, yeah, it's a little bit more expensive. So we change our budget, we change our buying habits. But the fish, the fish getting it from places that don't ship it around the world to process it, to get it to you. And then the meats locally going to the farms has been just that. That was one of our big points of coming here.

Karelle Laurent:

Yes, I think it's wonderful. And to your point, you eat less because it's better quality. You just make the most of it. And I think once you start making that shift, for a lot of people, it's scary, because they're like, Damn, it's so much more expensive. Yes, but actually, do you need to have meat five days a week? No, you could or

Kenny Bailey<br>:

12 ounces at one sitting. You know you can have, you know you can have five ounces,

Karelle Laurent:

you know, one day chicken, one day beef, and then one day you have some fish, and then one day you have, you know, some legumes, some beans and lentils, and it just there's seven days in a week. So there's plenty of opportunity to all different food. But that could be level seven in

Tom Regal:

the start small.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

So switching gears a little bit. You You know, I had a colleague of mine, a buddy of mine, who in from the US it was racing in nice for the world championship. So you have folks that are traveling, you know, internationally, how what's your recommendation for those folks, because diets are going to change, you're, you're going to be on a plane for multiple hours. What do you generally recommend for folks that are doing an international race? How do you, how do you, how do you kind of help them get prepared.

Karelle Laurent:

Get prepared. Yeah, so it's really interesting. Um, question. Yes. So it's just usually, depending on how early they go, it's when they rental when they have a rental apartment. I always try to encourage client, at least for the breakfast is to be able to get you know, to plan when we work weeks leading to an event that sort of internationally, is we work on that breakfast weeks before that, but we work on that breakfast towards being ready for that phrase. So if you are in a hotel or if you are in an apartment, then you just go and get the food sometimes, you know, I've lived in Asia. We used to go races in Indonesia, Indonesia, and there's nothing. Only thing you're going to find is a bucket of treats. So go with you, and you have your oats, you have your food. You bring everything because you need to have and you sometimes don't want to drink the coffee, because you live by the coffee, you know, like, it can be really different. So if it depends where you're going, sometimes you're lucky enough you go to the park, hiatus apartment, everything is like, can I have an egg, or can I have all of right? So it's manageable, but it's just to anticipate, right? It's planning that. So we talk a lot about this. We talk a lot about the food we are using the days leading to a rain, which go in line of the tapering and sometimes the dehydration that is coming from. Yep, and I've got plenty of experience with that from traveling overseas, so I can relate and give really good advice on this. But there's also also, you know, anticipating a lot, and what I sometimes see it's not necessarily because of the traveling, but it's because of the non anticipation and something happened, and it feels like the stress level is really high. So how can we how can we plan so you are ready to face any type of situation, whatever. Sometimes it's really related to the food or related to something that happens to the event, right? You've got the delay. Luggage or you've got. So actually, we talk a lot about that, because for me, it's really important, even if it's not directly linked only to the food, but it's the stress impact on the body. And we know how the stress response has an impact on the body. And you know, it's the whole part of visualization. Do you do a visualization before your race. You see yourself. What is going to happen if you have a function? Well, prepare that. Have a look at that. Do that because I'm changing tires. So my before my race last year is set me down in the he said, Okay, tire this. Do it. And he took the down. And no matter how I travel, I took my time. He didn't tell they said, right, 15 minutes. Imagine if you have a puncture. 15 minutes. Said it's nothing. So it's just talk about all of this and realizing that you're gonna have something happening. You're gonna lose your nutrition. It's possible that your suitcase with your gels are going to be delayed. Have you tested what's on the road? Do you know what's going to be on the race? We talk about all of this, and often it helps to prepare. And sometimes you have a plan B in your head. I work like this. I need to be able to see every type of you know what could happen, what could go wrong, not in a drama, drama kind of way, but if I know what could go wrong, then I know I can be prepared.

Tom Regal:

Yeah, for that. Yeah. And I like that idea of actually looking, looking ahead to where you're traveling, to what the traditional breakfasts are, what is that stuff? And if you could actually get some of that ahead of time to test it, try it. I love that, because I'm one of those people that over prepares. I'll do the research. I'll go through all of it. I'll see what it is. Yes, yes. Of that, it's like, so there's Plan A, B, C, D, E, F, and we just kind of navigate with whatever goes through there, and there's no stress when it happens, because you just go, oh, we just moved to this plan there. It just works, yeah?

Kenny Bailey<br>:

And I think, you know, I think that, you know, the running joke is the fourth discipline is, is nutrition, right? When it comes to these races, and it's funny, because we prepare more contingencies on running and everything else, but you will be brought down in a heartbeat if you're dehydrated or you miss a fuel, right? So you could be prepared on anything else. You could be the best cyclist you can be. You can have the fastest PRs on your run, and then if you skip a bottle or you don't if the food that's on the course doesn't sit well with you, you know a GI will will take you down.

Karelle Laurent:

A very simple example, even for athletes who are experienced, and I've had that with covid, I've had a couple of athletes that were very expensive on Kona before covid. They know exactly what they were taking. Their nutrition was nailed down. We always had this really nicely organized. And then I remember receiving a message from one of my clients, and he said to me, I don't know what's going on. I was sick like a dog. I just had this, and then it didn't work. What do you think is happening? And I said, Well, covid happened. Two years happened. So you can't go from not hitting anything when you go on your leisurely ride or on the trainer to go back to your 90 gram per hour, just because done it before. So we need to go back to slowly increasing back how we did the first time, right? Oh, yeah. Think of that. And I did a lot with experienced athletes who just race every six months, or race a year because they're busy, and suddenly they go back, they prepare their bottle, and you tested that?

Unknown:

No, but I'll be fine. And no, because

Karelle Laurent:

you need to get used to that again. Taking back the marathon. It's not because you run a marathon 10 years ago. You can run it next week. Yeah, that's a great analogy. Yeah, you've got to get back into some sort of a training to get back into it, and maybe even faster, because you beat an athletic but maybe you just need to to go back into a certain discipline of increasing

Kenny Bailey<br>:

that's such a great point. I mean, I just It clicks when you say it right, you know, to your point, everyone thinks, physically, well, I'm just going to go back and start my ramp and, you know, start here and be cool, and then you just eat the exact same thing, or you start eating at the same level that you did when you're, you know, six months into your into training, think, Well, I'm just going to start working down a lot of food, because I'm starting to train now. Food because I'm starting to train now. And don't ramp your ramp your nutrition.

Tom Regal:

That's a great point training the gut. It's training. Yeah,

Unknown:

that's funny.

Karelle Laurent:

And change product. Technology has changed established nowadays. So you change product because you're not going to take the same. Thing that you used to take seven, seven years ago, we now have very well formulated product out there, great flavors. So, yeah, it's, it's

Kenny Bailey<br>:

so about that, if you know, there's always you know nothing new on race day, right? So if you're going to get a new pair of shorts or a new wetsuit. You want to try it X amount of weeks or months ahead of time, or new shoes. Is there a nutrition equivalent to that as well? Is there a cutoff time, like, is it two weeks? Is it four weeks? It's is it, you know, if you're going to try a new gel or try a new supplement for your for your water in dirt and dirt, do you, what do you recommend? Is it? Is it?

Karelle Laurent:

Yeah, it's well to do well, I would say, if we're talking about a full or a middle distance, I would say it's great to plan at least six to eight weeks in advance. Okay, you have time. We have plenty of time to try different type of gel, different powder. So we do a really big exploration. Okay, never imposed a particular product on clients. I would always say, you should, you should try this. This is, I give the name of different brand than the older they try, and it needs to come from them. I like this texture. I don't like the neutral. I like having the strawberry taste, or I don't like strawberry taste, I want neutral. And then we put the plan together. We I call them the draft of the race plan together, and we get a little bit more of a of a picture of what you're going to take during the training session during your long ride, doing your run and and we tried, sometimes you've got to change products, because they certainly don't sell them

Kenny Bailey<br>:

on this particular or they change the formula, yeah, oh, if something

Karelle Laurent:

happened. But usually, yeah, we try not to. We're trying not to change. But I would say again, I think in the last two years, the, you know, the few big, big brand products are so well formulated, it really reduced a lot more of the GI issue we used to have in the past, sure,

Kenny Bailey<br>:

um, regularly. Well, even Iron Man now changed out of Gatorade to a different Yeah. So

Tom Regal:

just throwing everybody out, throwing everybody off lines. You talk about not liking change. People are complaining about it when they haven't even tried it yet. They're just absolutely like No, no, absolutely,

Karelle Laurent:

to be fair. I think it was a little bit of a miscommunication, because they actually changed the way the message came across is they changed the nutrition for hydration product. So it's almost well, even I my my husband told me that, and I was like, we're not talking about the same purpose here. So it wasn't they, I think they didn't put the message out there properly, because we're talking about hydration, and I think for what the purpose of the hydration, that new product is fantastic to have it, because I had experience on so many races where there is no option for proper hydration in hot climate. So for that extent, I think it's marvelous, but that that means that there's no nutrition.

Tom Regal:

Yeah, well, I found it interesting that people were were talking about, they said they needed the calories, the carbohydrates that were in the Gatorade endurance. And I'm doing the math, and I'm going, like, that is so minuscule. How much of that product are you drinking on the course that those tiny little calories, and I can't remember the grams, it was minuscule in the grams scheme of things. It's like, that should just be in addition to what you've got with you on your bike. But they're like, complaining that that was, like, without the make or break grams, that was their race. Absolutely

Karelle Laurent:

in hydration, you need to have a little bit of glucose and some sodium. So it's around, usually 15 grams of glucose for the absorption of the sodium. It works together, right? So, so I think that's why people got confused. That's not because they low carbs. It's because the purpose is hydration, to transport the sodium to your set. Yeah.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

Well, you know, instead of freaking out, you know, educate yourself first. So about you? You said you're a triathlete. Do you have a race coming up this year? It what? What is on your calendar? Wow,

Karelle Laurent:

so I've just done my race. It was not it was not fabulous. So that was my secret.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

Did you run out of calories? You ran out of calories. You dehydrated yourself, didn't you? Would that be the i. Exciting?

Karelle Laurent:

No, my nutrition was great, perfect. That's always the thing that is actually

Kenny Bailey<br>:

the one thing you get, right? Yeah,

Karelle Laurent:

no, what happened is so moving out of Asia, Asia, you swim. The water is so warm, it's always very hot. I do very well in hot climate. I won't say very well, but I do well in hot climate. And moving to Europe has been a little bit of a challenging moment, a little colder, especially with the water. So a couple of places, 16 degrees. My first one, I kind of had a panic attacks in the swing thinking, What is going on, and then train up. And then I realized it was the cold actually, that did that. And last year that I'm done with the cold water. Now I'm going to look for a race. The only race that had a really nice warm lake was in Zurich. It's called rappersville, Jonas. So I was like, hey, all my friends, let's go to rappersville. Jonas, the lake is 20 degrees for the race in early June. So everyone signed up, except, guess what? No, spring, the lake was at 13 degrees. Oh,

Kenny Bailey<br>:

wow, that's cold in us. I'm trying to figure out the US calculation on that just cold. That would be just

Karelle Laurent:

cold. It's just cold. Degrees would be, yeah, you'd just make the calculation, and just I actually wondered if I would be able to go in the water, and I did, Ironman was good enough to shorten the swim. A lot of people were complaining, but I have to say, we're not all sweets and everybody sorry, I actually broke on on the other side of the mountain, maybe about two hours drive from Zurich, and I'm like, but I it was running a little bit on the bike. It was a little tiny bit slower than I was expecting. It was a very hilly bike post, but I really enjoyed it. I really enjoyed that the run I had just I was in, in I could not finish. It was I finished, but I was just thinking, and, and they had lovely little soup, and they had Cook, and I just stopped because, and it's a really interesting concept, actually, because we, with a couple of friends. Were like, because it's cold, we need to increase carbohydrates, because you obviously need to warm up. And I did, but I think it was just the damage was done

Tom Regal:

in the water. Yeah, you started off way too cold. And yeah, no, I was

Karelle Laurent:

disappointed. It was a very slow run, much slower than I was hoping to do, but so I'm going to digest this, and then

Kenny Bailey<br>:

the next one, find a warm I have an interesting story about the water I was in. I was in Northern California over the weekend, and the lake was 6263 degrees, yeah. And you tell that to a triathlete, right? You're like, Okay, do I need booties? Do I need? You know, you start asking, right? The last race I did, the full Ironman, it was 63 degrees, and my feet were numb when I got out of the water, right? So, as a triathlete, you look at 6263 degrees, we went to a lake that has a park with a bunch of people, and there's kids splashing with their with their bathing suits on, and people are splashing around, and it's like they think that 6263 degrees was nothing, and we're over there freaking out, like as triathletes going and I have you know, we're going to be in the water for a long time, but it's just so funny, how those guys treat it like a fun little vacation. And I'm like, that's crazy.

Karelle Laurent:

You don't stay in the water the same at the same time? Yeah, I know, but it was just silly in an upright so I have a fabulous, oh, think about that. Yeah, here is great, because the sea Portugal is, is quite nice. It's not Hawaii, but you know where you're swimming, and it is quite knowledgeable and, and actually, is always gave good tips on the way of swimming, etc, and the way you are flat, you're, you don't have the same blood in the leg, so it's normal that you you're, you know, okay, good, yeah. So I

Kenny Bailey<br>:

don't want to feel wimpy that the wimpy people were putting on a bunch of knee pain, a bunch of kids.

Tom Regal:

Well, you are, but anyway, that's That's true.

Unknown:

Body pulls it

Tom Regal:

pulls all your blood into your torso to keep your heart warm and that so it's going to pull from your extremities anyway, so you're immediately going to get cold. But we routinely, when I was living in California, routinely summer water in the ocean, 65 degrees Fahrenheit. If it got up to 68 or 69 it was balmy. And then in the winter, times was down in the 47 degrees. And I think three was 53 Fahrenheit was the coldest I swam in. And that was, yeah, I didn't, I didn't appreciate that as much.

Unknown:

Much? Yeah. No, it's

Tom Regal:

not as much fun. Yeah. So what about the cycling in Portugal? We mentioned this at the very beginning of the show, and like, I've been, I've been teasing my wife said, Someday when we retire, which we're never going to retire, we're constantly doing something that I wanted to, like, go to Spain or Europe, and have, like, a camp, a triathlon camp. Live there for a month and have camps so, so now, now I'm, I'm not looking at Spain anymore, because Portugal sounds really fantastic. What is the cycling like there, and how soon can we get there?

Karelle Laurent:

Yeah, which is the south of Portugal is beautiful and it's quite healing, not crazy healing. The heels will never be very, very long, but you can definitely have a good day on the bike and a challenging ride. Now, when I moved here three years ago, I've met first of all, I was like, oh my god, I'm able to write. I had a really strong group of girlfriend where I was riding with in Singapore. I was like, I'm gonna be on my own. Who am I gonna ride this and and I met this lovely lady. She's British, she's living here. She's called Fiona, and we really bonded together. She was doing some social rides. She used to be elite athlete. She doesn't like to talk about it, but she's pretty awesome. And now she's the tour guide in the alga. And we bonded really nicely together. Just always we thought, you know, would it be so nice to go on a cycling trip and you eat well and you spend a bit of time to look after yourself, and then we're like, oh, sure, we did do that. So we did so we've done for the last three years. I think we've done six now. So we call that the cycling, Nutrition Wellness

Unknown:

retreat. Oh, that was so much fun. It's so much fun.

Karelle Laurent:

And you have couples coming, so we often have Canadian coming and etc. So any age we usually, depending on how many, we keep it small. So it's quite small. We're not going to be 40. It's usually between, I would say, five to 15 people maximum, and usually around eight or 10 in the in most cases, but we've had couples, and sometimes the ladies are coming on the electric bikes because they haven't been riding as much as gentlemen, or sometimes ladies are coming with their girlfriends and they just smashing up the hills. But it's fabulous. It's a really good week. We are staying in this beautiful boutique hotel in in the fields, in the Algarve. So we about 30 minutes from the airport, 30 minutes from the coast, where some some clients might want to spend another couple of days on the beach and just relaxing and eating seafood. It's a farm to table boutique hotels. So all the produce that we are eating, they are actually getting from the farm, depending on where you're coming during the year, it's going to be lamb, it's going to be pumpkin, it's going to be really seasonal and fabulous food the hotel. I want

Kenny Bailey<br>:

to go. Can I go? My gosh, this sounds like incredible, like we get a ride all day. We get eat incredible food, and then we get to, can we have a little glass of wine at the end? Oh, yeah, okay. Then I've said, Yeah, we're good, we're good, we're good.

Unknown:

Yoga and there's another Okay. Never

Kenny Bailey<br>:

mind time out. Everyone comes

Karelle Laurent:

that's nice. And yeah, so I highly recommend to come and spend a week in Portugal. And the good news is, next year we also had a crazy conversation, and we're like, we did the gravel week together last year, and we were like, Oh, should we just do gravel? Okay, we've now next week, we're doing one cycling, nutrition and wellness on ground, because beautiful. So that would be fun. So can't wait to see you guys. I

Tom Regal:

might be moving in Portugal. I might just at least move there, signing

Kenny Bailey<br>:

up next week. I need to that would

Karelle Laurent:

be my gosh. Sometimes we're riding for for an hour, and you've seen one car and they wait behind you, and you just have to say, you get to go.

Tom Regal:

I gotta say that, that all the stories that I hear of friends have been over to Europe to ride on bikes, just everyone's a little bit more appreciative and a little bit more empathetic to cyclists on the road, and there's a little bit more respect here. It seems to be getting worse and worse, so we might just end up just moving just so we can ride a little bit safer kids.

Karelle Laurent:

It's really cold. I found when we go to France and we ride I. Particularly scared of the cars, rather than the downhill camping. The camp man is just so hard because they take so much space. But what I've noticed lately is now the closing some of the code during the summer, so especially in the PM, they would be their norms last year. Okay, so this weekend, this weekend, this it's a known car. It's only cyclists. We haven't tested out because it was not when we were there, but it's find out if you guys are going to France before you book your trip. Have a look and find out when they closing the roads. And you can try to do Yeah, great.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

It would be better. So other than your incredible gravel thing is, you got anything else coming up, anything else you want to tell the audience about?

Karelle Laurent:

No, just, yeah, it's so if your, if your audience is interested, to even have a chat with me, I've got the discovery call, and we can have a chat and and discuss if it's something you I can help with your with your goal, but otherwise, yeah, the cycling retreat, I work with a lot of athletes at the moment with preparing some ladies for for Connor. Then there's nice coming up. The ladies are coming in, nice and easy.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

Men are in Connor. Yeah. And then New Zealand,

Karelle Laurent:

there's still a lot of people going in New Zealand as well. It's maybe far for you, but I've got a few athletes going to New Zealand for the worldships.

Tom Regal:

There's a few we there's a couple people local. There's a couple local folks that are going there. I know for sure, I don't have any athletes that are that are going there yet. So

Kenny Bailey<br>:

New Zealand is the half or

Tom Regal:

Yeah, 70.3 more times.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

I believe Bella was in Kona, and she may have qualified for that. Yeah,

Tom Regal:

Sierra and Bella, or we have a we

Kenny Bailey<br>:

had a mother daughter, folks, Ironman. They both made it to Kona last year, and they, they were able to compete together, 18 year old. And I forgot how old the mom was, yeah. So they both were in Kona, and the the daughter is an absolute animal, so she's, I think she qualified for Worlds. They're

Tom Regal:

both pretty, pretty good athletes. So, yeah, so I think they might have qualified for for World 70 point threes as well. So, and I think there's a couple others here that we've talked to, so we've got a bunch a few people going over there, yeah.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

So this has been a fun conversation. Thank you so much for spending time. I think, I think you know, you can have, you can have this for hours, right? Because of just the many dimensions of of just nutrition and hydration and just people's like you said, it's it's both kind of universal, personal all the same time, right? So it's

Tom Regal:

a journey that I think everyone I want to it. It can be so daunting at the beginning, and I think that's part of our conversation, is to talk through this as much as we possibly can, to just make it, break it down into little easy changes, little small changes. Don't try to change the world all at once, and then it becomes a habit. Once you create the habit, then you can kind of go from there, but it's you have to put some effort into it. You really have to, you have to do a little research on like, where your food's coming from. You have to look at what you need to eat, certainly speaking with a professional like you to help guide them through what it is that's causing issues and what can help and what's not, and then trying not to just do the magic bullet thing, just make one change, and everything's perfect, right? So there has to be a little effort, and it has to be a priority in your life, and it certainly has to happen sooner than later, because if you wait until you're 70, right, you've waited too long, and it's it's almost too late.

Karelle Laurent:

It's never too late, never too late. I have, it's interesting, but I have a few older athletes in Singapore and incredible different marathons every year. They're 75 but they started, I think, where they 55 they're because I every time I'm like, Oh, this is gonna be good when we all

Tom Regal:

it gives me hope. There's no

Karelle Laurent:

age to stop, but you're giving yourself a chance to stop as early as possible. And it's a man of time where, you know, look like you said, looking at the quality of the food, it feels really daunting. And it doesn't have to be a perfect picture. And, and I'm really highlighting this because as athlete, we want to do perfection. We want the workout to be green, yes, the result to show quickly, but it's, this is like, you know, gardening, this is, this is really important to take time to be patient, because it's your health. And I think I often say that to people, my generation, you know, we are in a place where the population. Is aging. The healthcare system is already being pulled in into a really difficult situation. We don't know how things are going to be in 2030, years time. And I see even the medical system in France, it's really, really critical. And you hear, you know, you hear people waiting for hours when they go to the hospital and private is not always the option for a lot of people. So really looking after yourself is buying new time. I think we don't have the choice. We need to look after ourselves. We need to invest in our own health in order for us to be have this prevention of not having to go to the hospital or rely to the medical system and the healthcare system to help us when we need to, and that's something we need to do now, not in 15 years time when we already know that there is not enough doctors and The healthcare system is is struggling, and we find out, however, in a very terrible situation during covid, and we know this so it is, it is really important to even if it's because we athletes and performance is important and we loving our sports and it's all about seeking pleasure. Think it's really important to realize that investing in your own health, it's it's a priority, yeah,

Tom Regal:

yeah, for sure and for sure. So thank you so much for joining us. This has been great, wonderful. We really

Karelle Laurent:

yeah questions from athlete. I'm happy to come back.

Tom Regal:

Okay, absolutely, we'll do that. So everyone, give us your questions and comments. We appreciate all the five stars, thumbs up that gives us a little bit higher up in the algorithm. Gets more and more people to get out there and listen to our product. We've got our YouTube channel you'll see on the video here, subscribe, you know, to make sure that you don't miss any of the new episodes that pop up and send us your questions and comments. I realize that I'm behind on some Instagram comments that have popped up, so bear with me. If I haven't responded to you, there was a few that popped up. I didn't realize they were there. So keep sending in question to comments, and then maybe we'll have Karel back on again. Maybe just go over there and have a big cycling trip and come back and talk about it, because that would be outstanding as well. Maybe we'll come do the podcast in person. There we go. We're doing it.

Kenny Bailey<br>:

So we're looking for a sponsor to get Tom and I to Portugal. Anybody is there a bike sponsor

Tom Regal:

or something,

Kenny Bailey<br>:

exactly, somebody? Let's, let's

Tom Regal:

do all of that. So thank you again. Appreciate everyone. Kenny Karel, thank you for everybody, we'll We'll catch you on the next show.

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